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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Chaucer’s character Pandare (in Troilus and Criseyde) (see also Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida), from Italian Pandaro (found in Boccaccio), from Latin Pandarus (found in Greek mythology), from Ancient Greek Πάνδαρος (Pándaros).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pander (plural panders)

  1. A person who furthers the illicit love-affairs of others; a pimp or procurer. (Later panderer.)
    • 1992, Moncrieff/Kilmartin/Enright, translating Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way, Folio Society 2005, p. 190:
      It was not only the brilliant phalanx of virtuous dowagers, generals and academicians with whom he was most intimately associated that Swann so cynically compelled to serve him as panders.
  2. An offer of illicit sex with a third party.
  3. An illicit or illegal offer, usually to tempt.
  4. (by extension) One who ministers to the evil designs and passions of another.
    • Burke
      Those wicked panders to avarice and ambition.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pander (third-person singular simple present panders, present participle pandering, simple past and past participle pandered)

  1. (intransitive) To offer illicit sex with a third party; to pimp.
  2. (intransitive) To tempt with, to appeal or cater to (improper motivations, etc.); to assist in the gratification of.
    His latest speech simply seems to pander to the worst instincts of the electorate.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpanə/, [ˈpʰanə]

NounEdit

pander c

  1. plural indefinite of pande

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pander

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of pandō