pantsie

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

pants +‎ -ie

NounEdit

pantsie (plural pantsies)

  1. (childish) Underpants.
    • 1998, Time - Volume 152, Issues 18-26, page 99:
      Well, it's stuff for modern kids: the ones who are primal enough to giggle at a peepee rainbow (created by infantsinanursery) and the “pooped in his pantsie" jokes, ...
    • 1998, P. J. O'Rourke, “The CEO of the Sofa”, in Forbes, volume 161, number 7-12:
      In fact, if I See One more bootie, blankie, snugglie, jammie, hatsie, pantsie or shirtsie covered in twee, cloying, dwarfish bears, I'm going to need a bottle myself.
    • 2008, Tamarisk Row:
      Sometimes one of those children that the others dare not argue with points to an old lady, one of the many who live in the rows of old brick cottages between the church and the main streets of the city, and calls out – old Blue Nancy with blowflies in her pantsie, and starts to run as if the woman is chasing him.

AnagramsEdit