paramount

See also: Paramount

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*h₂éd

From Anglo-Norman paramont, paramount (paramount, pre-eminent; above), from Old French par, per (by) + amont, amunt (upward).[1] Par is derived from Latin per (by means of, through), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to go through; to carry forth, fare);[2] amont and amunt are from Latin ad montem (to the mountain; upward), from ad (up to) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (at; to)) + montem (the accusative singular of mōns (mount, mountain), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to stand out, tower)).[3]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

paramount (not comparable)

  1. (often postpositive) Highest, supreme; also, chief, leading, pre-eminent.
    Synonym: utmost
    Antonym: paravail
  2. Of the highest importance.
    Synonyms: crucial, imperative; see also Thesaurus:important
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:insignificant
    Getting those credit cards paid off is paramount.
  3. (obsolete) Of a law, right, etc.: having precedence over or superior to another.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:superior

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

paramount (plural paramounts)

  1. A chief or superior; (specifically, chiefly South Africa) an African chief having the highest status in a region; a paramount chief.
  2. (obsolete) A supreme ruler; an overlord; (specifically, historical) in the feudal system, a landowner who did not derive ownership of the land from anyone else, and who was able to grant fees to others; a lord paramount.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ paramount, adj., n., and adv.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “paramount1, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  2. ^ Compare “per, prep.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “per, prep.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ Compare “amount, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “amount, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further readingEdit