parasite

See also: parasité

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French parasite, from Latin parasitus, from Ancient Greek παράσιτος (parásitos, person who eats at the table of another), from noun use of adjective meaning "feeding beside", from παρά (pará, beside) + σῖτος (sîtos, food).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parasite (plural parasites)

  1. (derogatory) A person who lives on other people's efforts or expense and gives little or nothing back. [from 16th c.]
    • 2021 December 1, monamu98, “Thai and Korean netizens oppose debut of H1-Key's Sitala over father's alleged support of dictatorship”, in sportskeeda.com[1], sportskeeda, retrieved 2021-12-03:
      A royalist who publicly called for a military intervention to protect the parasite monarchy.
    • 1902, Hilaire Belloc, The Path to Rome:
      Of all the corrupting effects of wealth there is none worse than this, that it makes the wealthy (and their parasites) think in some way divine, or at least a lovely character of the mind, what is in truth nothing but their power of luxurious living.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:scrounger
  2. (derogatory) A sycophant or hanger-on.
  3. (biology) An organism that lives on or in another organism of a different species, deriving benefit from living on or in that other organism, while not contributing towards that other organism sufficiently to cover the cost to that other organism.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 3, page 154:
      ...and the mistletoe crept round many of the oaks—that pleasant parasite, whose associations belong rather to the hearth and lighted hall than to its native branches.
    • 2013 March 1, Harold J. Morowitz, “The Smallest Cell”, in American Scientist[2], volume 101, number 2, page 83:
      It is likely that the long evolutionary trajectory of Mycoplasma went from a reductive autotroph to oxidative heterotroph to a cell-wall–defective degenerate parasite. This evolutionary trajectory assumes the simplicity to complexity route of biogenesis, a point of view that is not universally accepted.
    Lice, fleas, ticks and mites are widely spread parasites.
  4. (literary, poetic) A climbing plant which is supported by a wall, trellis etc. [from 19th c.]
    • 1813, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Canto I”, in Queen Mab; [], London: [] P. B. Shelley, [], OCLC 36924440, page 3:
      Her golden tresses shade / The bosom's stainless pride, / Curling like tendrils of the parasite / Around a marble column.
  5. (historical) A retainer or companion of an ancient Celtic warrior, who praised him in song or poetry at gatherings; a bard.
  6. (aviation) A component of a composite aircraft which is carried aloft and air-launched by a larger carrier aircraft or mother ship to support the primary mission of the carrier.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin parasītus, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek παράσιτος (parásitos).

NounEdit

parasite m (plural parasites)

  1. parasite
  2. (electronics, in the plural) radio interference
    Des parasites troublent l'appareil.
    The equipment is affected by radio interference.

AdjectiveEdit

parasite (plural parasites)

  1. parasitic
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Romanian: parazit
  • Turkish: parazit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

parasite

  1. inflection of parasiter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

parasīte

  1. vocative singular of parasītus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

parasite

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of parasitar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of parasitar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of parasitar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of parasitar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

parasite

  1. inflection of parasitar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative