Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined circa 1828 as a verb, used as a noun since about 1904. From French parler ‎(speak).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

parlay ‎(third-person singular simple present parlays, present participle parlaying, simple past and past participle parlayed)

  1. (transitive) To carry forward the stake and winnings from a bet onto a subsequent wager.
  2. (by extension) To increase.
  3. To speak about peace. To have peace talks. See also: pow-wow.
  4. (transitive) To convert into something better.
    • April 19 2002, Scott Tobias, AV Club Fightville[1]
      Epperlein and Tucker focus on two featherweight hopefuls: Dustin Poirier, a formidable contender who’s looking to parlay a history of schoolyard violence and street-fighting into a potential career, and Albert Stainback, a more thoughtful yet more erratic and undisciplined fighter whose chief gimmick is entering the ring wearing a hat like the one Malcolm McDowell wore in A Clockwork Orange.

NounEdit

parlay ‎(plural parlays)

  1. Such a bet or series of bets.

See alsoEdit


QuechuaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish parlar.

NounEdit

parlay

  1. speech, language

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

parlay

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to speak, converse, talk

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

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