See also: Pas, PAS, PAs, pás, pâs, păs, pąs, -pas, pa's, paś, Paś, and ṕås

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French pas.

NounEdit

pas (plural pas)

  1. (now rare) The right of going foremost; precedence. [from 18th c.]
    • 1792, Charlotte Smith, Desmond, Broadview 2001, p. 71:
      ‘Nobody of any elegance of manners can exist, where tradesmen, attornies, and mechanics have the pas.’
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 9, in Vanity Fair, London: Bradbury and Evans  [], published 1848, OCLC 3174108:
      Even Mrs. Bute Crawley, the Rector's wife, refused to visit her, as she said she would never give the pas to a tradesman's daughter.
  2. A step in a dance. [from 18th c.]
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pas

  1. plural of pa

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [pɑs]
  • (file)

NounEdit

pas (plural passe)

  1. pace, step
  2. pass (a card or document)
    die paswette tydens die apartheidsjare - the pass laws during the years of apartheid

ReferencesEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *pa ̊, from Proto-Indo-European *pós (directly to, at, after). Cognate to Ancient Greek πός (pós, at, to, by), Old Church Slavonic по (po, behind, after).

PrepositionEdit

pas (+ablative)

  1. behind, beyond
  2. after
  3. at
  4. over
  5. against

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. behind
  2. after
  3. hence

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


AragoneseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. emphasises a negation; (not) at all; (not) ever
    • 2010, Academia de l’Aragonés, Propuesta ortografica de l’Academia de l’Aragonés, 2nd edition, Edacar, page I:
      –pero no pas superficial, asperamos–
      – but not at all superficial, we hope –
    • 2010, Academia de l’Aragonés, Propuesta ortografica de l’Academia de l’Aragonés, 2nd edition, Edacar, page 20:
      No ocurre pas debant de f-, []
      It doesn’t ever occur before f-, []

See alsoEdit


AsturianEdit

NounEdit

pas m pl

  1. plural of

AzerbaijaniEdit

NounEdit

pas (definite accusative pası, plural paslar)

  1. rust
    1. deteriorated state of iron or steel
    2. disease of plants
  2. (figuratively) shame, disgrace, infamy
    Synonym: eyib

DeclensionEdit

    Declension of pas
singular plural
nominative pas
paslar
definite accusative pası
pasları
dative pasa
paslara
locative pasda
paslarda
ablative pasdan
paslardan
definite genitive pasın
pasların
    Possessive forms of pas
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) pasım paslarım
sənin (your) pasın pasların
onun (his/her/its) pası pasları
bizim (our) pasımız paslarımız
sizin (your) pasınız paslarınız
onların (their) pası or pasları pasları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) pasımı paslarımı
sənin (your) pasını paslarını
onun (his/her/its) pasını paslarını
bizim (our) pasımızı paslarımızı
sizin (your) pasınızı paslarınızı
onların (their) pasını or paslarını paslarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) pasıma paslarıma
sənin (your) pasına paslarına
onun (his/her/its) pasına paslarına
bizim (our) pasımıza paslarımıza
sizin (your) pasınıza paslarınıza
onların (their) pasına or paslarına paslarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) pasımda paslarımda
sənin (your) pasında paslarında
onun (his/her/its) pasında paslarında
bizim (our) pasımızda paslarımızda
sizin (your) pasınızda paslarınızda
onların (their) pasında or paslarında paslarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) pasımdan paslarımdan
sənin (your) pasından paslarından
onun (his/her/its) pasından paslarından
bizim (our) pasımızdan paslarımızdan
sizin (your) pasınızdan paslarınızdan
onların (their) pasından or paslarından paslarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) pasımın paslarımın
sənin (your) pasının paslarının
onun (his/her/its) pasının paslarının
bizim (our) pasımızın paslarımızın
sizin (your) pasınızın paslarınızın
onların (their) pasının or paslarının paslarının

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • pas” in Obastan.com.

Bau BidayuhEdit

NounEdit

pas

  1. squirrel (rodent)

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Catalan pas, from Latin passus (step). Its use as an auxiliary adverb comes from an accusative use (Latin necpassum) in negative constructions – literally ‘not…a step’, i.e. ‘not at all’ – originally used with certain verbs of motion. Compare similarly used French pas. Cognate with Galician and Spanish paso and Portuguese passo.

NounEdit

pas m (plural passos)

  1. pace, step
  2. (historical, measure) paso, Spanish pace, a traditional unit of length
  3. (figuratively) pace, action
  4. pace, gait, rhythm of walking
SynonymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
  • (unit of length): peu (⅕ pas), vara (⅗ pas), braça (1⅕ pas)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. (in negative sentences) Used to intensify negation: at all, ever
    No feu pas aixòDo not ever do this
    No serà pas important.It won't matter. (literally, “It won't be so important.”)
Usage notesEdit

The main marker of negation in Catalan is the adverb no. No is placed before the verbs, while pas is usually placed after it. Unlike Occitan or French, where pas and pas is a mandatory negative particle (under many circumstances); in Catalan, pas is only used as an optional intensifier of negation. However, some northern dialects use "pas" instead of "no" as the mandatory negative particle. Also, in many dialects "pas" has totally disappeared.

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from passar.

NounEdit

pas m (plural passos)

  1. passing
  2. crossing
    pas zebrazebra crossing
  3. passage
    ritu de pasrite of passage
  4. pitch (distance between evenly spaced objects)
    pas de rosca(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    pas polar(please add an English translation of this usage example)
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ChuukeseEdit

PrepositionEdit

pas

  1. past

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

pas m inan

  1. Alternative form of pás (waist)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pas m inan

  1. passport
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

pas

  1. second-person singular imperative of pást

Further readingEdit

  • pas in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • pas in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from German Pass, from Italian passaporto.

NounEdit

pas n (singular definite passet, plural indefinite pas)

  1. passport
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French pas and German Pass, from Latin passus.

NounEdit

pas n (singular definite passet, plural indefinite passer)

  1. (geography) mountain pass
    Synonym: bjergpas
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from French passe, from French passer.

NounEdit

pas c (singular definite passen, plural indefinite passer)

  1. (card games) pass
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Deverbal from passen, from Middle Dutch passen, from pas, from Old French pas, from Latin passus. Equivalent to a derivation from etymology 2.

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. just, recently
  2. hardly
  3. only, not until, not any sooner
    Pas als je kamer is opgeruimd, krijg je een koekje.
    Only when your room has been cleaned up, you'll get a cookie.
  4. nowreally
    Da's pas stoer!
    Now that is really cool!
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: pas
  • Negerhollands: pas
  • Aukan: pasi pasi
  • Caribbean Hindustani: pás
  • Caribbean Javanese: pas
  • Volapük: pas

AdjectiveEdit

pas (used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. fitting, having a proper fit, having the correct size and shape
    Die schoenen zijn niet pas.
    Those shoes do not fit well.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Indonesian: pas

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch pas, from Old French pas, from Latin passus.

NounEdit

pas m (plural passen, diminutive pasje n)

  1. pace, step; also as a measure of distance
  2. (geography) mountain pass
  3. fit of an object, notably depending on forms and/or dimensions
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: pas
  • Indonesian: pas

Etymology 3Edit

From paspoort or from etymology 2.

NounEdit

pas m (plural passen, diminutive pasje n)

  1. pass, passport (travel document)
  2. identification document
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

pas

  1. first-person singular present indicative of passen
  2. imperative of passen

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

< passata

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑs/, [ˈpɑs̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑs
  • Syllabification(key): pas

InterjectionEdit

pas

  1. (card games) I pass!

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pas, from Latin passus.

Its use as an auxiliary negative adverb comes from an accusative use (Latin necpassum) in negative constructions – literally “not… a step”, i.e. “not at all” – originally used with certain verbs of motion. In older French other nouns could also be used in this way, such as ne… goutte (not… a drop) and ne… mie (not… a crumb), but in the modern language pas has become grammaticalised.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pas m (plural pas)

  1. step, pace, footstep
    • 2018, Zaz, On s'en remet jamais
      Des pas qu'on gravait dans la neige sont partis avec le printemps.
      Steps we etched in the snow are gone with the [arrival of] spring.
  2. (geography) strait, pass
    Pas de CalaisStrait of Dover
  3. thread, pitch (of a screw or nut)

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. The most common adverb of negation in French, typically translating into English as not, don't, doesn't, etc.
    Je ne sais pas.
    I don't know
    Ma grande sœur n'habite pas avec nous.
    My big sister doesn't live with us.
    J’veux pas travailler.
    I don't wanna work.
    (Je ne veux pas travailler)

Usage notesEdit

  • The adverb of negation pas is normally used in conjunction with the particle ne, as in the examples Je ne sais pas and Ma grande sœur n’habite pas avec nous above. In colloquial language, ne can be dropped, as in the example J'veux pas travailler above.
  • Word order:[1]
    • Pas directly follows the inflected verb, which itself follows the particle ne;
      Il ne mange pas.He's not eating.
      Ne le touchez pas.Don't touch him.
    • in compound verb structures it is placed between the inflected auxiliary and the participle.
      Il n'a pas mangé.He didn't eat.
    • When negating an infinitive verb, pas normally follows ne and precedes that verb in the construction ne pas + infinitive (though the sequence ne + infinitive + pas was common in the Classical French of the 17th and 18th centuries).
      Il a reçu une leçon à ne pas oublier.He received a lesson not to be forgotten.
    • pas can be placed before an adverb that modifies all or part of a verbal syntagma, but it directly follows an adverb that modifies the whole sentence.
      Je n'ai pas vraiment compris.I didn't truly understand.
      Il n'est probablement pas arrivé.He probably hasn't arrived.
    • Certain adverbs (e.g. même) can be used before or after pas without affecting the meaning of the phrase. With other adverbs (e.g. toujours), there may be considerable difference in meaning depending on whether pas comes before or after.
      pas toujoursnot always
      toujours passtill not

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ pas”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin passus.

NounEdit

pas m (plural pass)

  1. step, footstep
  2. pace

Related termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈpas]
  • Hyphenation: pas

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Dutch passend, pas, from Middle Dutch pas, passen, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, pandere (to spread, unfold, stretch), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, *pete- (to spread, stretch out).

NounEdit

pas (plural pas-pas, first-person possessive pasku, second-person possessive pasmu, third-person possessive pasnya)

  1. pass, permission or license to pass, or to go and come
  2. mountain pass
Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pas (comparative lebih pas, superlative paling pas)

  1. (colloquial) fit, suitable, proper.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

pas

  1. to pass, to achieve a successful outcome from
    Synonym: lulus

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pas (first-person possessive pasku, second-person possessive pasmu, third-person possessive pasnya)

  1. (archaic) Alternative spelling of opas.

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pas m (genitive singular pas, nominative plural pasanna)

  1. passport
  2. pass

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pas phas bpas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pàs

  1. (usually with accusative) by; with; at
    Ar tu norėtum sėdėti pas mane?
    Would you like to sit by/with me?
    Mes galime valgyti pas tave.
    We can eat at your place.
    Jis gyvena pas savo tėvus.
    He lives with his parents.

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *pojasъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pas m

  1. belt

DeclensionEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pas.

NounEdit

pas m (plural pas)

  1. pace; step

DescendantsEdit


OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan pas, from Latin passus.

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. (after the verb) not (negates the meaning of a verb)
  2. Intensifies adverbs of negation
    pas jamainever ever
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pas m

  1. step, pace

Old FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin passus.

NounEdit

pas m (oblique plural pas, nominative singular pas, nominative plural pas)

  1. pace; step
    • 13th c., uncertain (perhaps Adam de la Halle), Li Jus du pelerin :
      Segnieur, pelerins sui, si ai alé maint pas, / par viles, par castiaus, par chités, par trespas.
      Sirs, I am a pilgrim, and I have travelled a lot (literally, "I have gone steps a lot"), through towns, castles, cities, passageways.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: pace
  • Middle French: pas

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin pastus (pasture).

NounEdit

pas m (oblique plural pas, nominative singular pas, nominative plural pas)

  1. Alternative form of past
    • 13th c., uncertain (perhaps Adam de la Halle), Li Jus du pelerin :
      S'aroie bien mestier que je fusse à repas, / car n'ai mie par tout mout bien trouvé mes pas.
      It'd be great to make some arrangement so I can have a meal, because not always, not at all, have I found food wherever I've been.

See alsoEdit


PapiamentuEdit

 

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese paz and Spanish paz and Kabuverdianu pás.

NounEdit

pas

  1. peace

PhaluraEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Pashto [script needed] (pas).

PronunciationEdit

PostpositionEdit

pas (پس)

  1. after

ReferencesEdit

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *pojasъ.

NounEdit

pas m inan

  1. belt
  2. lane (lengthwise division of roadway)
  3. (heraldry) fess
DeclensionEdit
Alternative formsEdit
  • pás (obsolete, dialectal)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French passe.

NounEdit

pas m inan

  1. (in card games) pass

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from French pas.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pa/
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Syllabification: pas

NounEdit

pas m inan

  1. pas, step

Further readingEdit

  • pas in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pas in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin passus.

NounEdit

pas m (plural pași)

  1. step, pace, footstep, stride
  2. gait
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from German Pass, French pas.

NounEdit

pas n (plural pasuri)

  1. mountain pass
    Synonym: trecătoare
  2. (dated) passport
    Synonym: pașaport
DeclensionEdit

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

pas m (genitive singular pais, plural pasaichean)

  1. pass (permission)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȁs m (Cyrillic spelling па̏с)

  1. dog
    Volim svog psa.I love my dog.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened form of pȍjās.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȃs m (Cyrillic spelling па̑с)

  1. (regional) belt, girdle
  2. (regional) waist, waistline
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From English pass or French passe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȃs m (Cyrillic spelling па̑с)

  1. (sports) pass
DeclensionEdit

TatarEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

pas

  1. price

Tok PisinEdit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

EtymologyEdit

From English pouch.

NounEdit

pas

  1. pouch

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pas

  1. closed; shut; sealed
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 2:24:
      Olsem na dispela pasin i kamap. Man i save lusim papamama na i pas wantaim meri bilong en, na tupela i kamap wanpela bodi tasol.
      →New International Version translation

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑs/
  • Hyphenation: pas

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Ottoman Turkish پاس(rust).

NounEdit

pas (definite accusative pası, plural paslar)

  1. rust (oxidation of metal)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection
Nominative pas
Definite accusative pası
Singular Plural
Nominative pas paslar
Definite accusative pası pasları
Dative pasa paslara
Locative pasta paslarda
Ablative pastan paslardan
Genitive pasın pasların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular pasım paslarım
2nd singular pasın pasların
3rd singular pası pasları
1st plural pasımız paslarımız
2nd plural pasınız paslarınız
3rd plural pasları pasları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular pasımı paslarımı
2nd singular pasını paslarını
3rd singular pasını paslarını
1st plural pasımızı paslarımızı
2nd plural pasınızı paslarınızı
3rd plural paslarını paslarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular pasıma paslarıma
2nd singular pasına paslarına
3rd singular pasına paslarına
1st plural pasımıza paslarımıza
2nd plural pasınıza paslarınıza
3rd plural paslarına paslarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular pasımda paslarımda
2nd singular pasında paslarında
3rd singular pasında paslarında
1st plural pasımızda paslarımızda
2nd plural pasınızda paslarınızda
3rd plural paslarında paslarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular pasımdan paslarımdan
2nd singular pasından paslarından
3rd singular pasından paslarından
1st plural pasımızdan paslarımızdan
2nd plural pasınızdan paslarınızdan
3rd plural paslarından paslarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular pasımın paslarımın
2nd singular pasının paslarının
3rd singular pasının paslarının
1st plural pasımızın paslarımızın
2nd plural pasınızın paslarınızın
3rd plural paslarının paslarının
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular pasım paslarım
2nd singular passın paslarsın
3rd singular pas
pastır
paslar
paslardır
1st plural pasız paslarız
2nd plural passınız paslarsınız
3rd plural paslar paslardır
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English pass or from French passe.

NounEdit

pas (definite accusative pası, plural paslar)

  1. (sports) pass (The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

pas

  1. (card games) A phrase indicating that the player is declining to play their turn; I pass

Further readingEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Apparently introduced by Arie de Jong in Volapük Nulik. If so, probably borrowed from Dutch pas.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

pas

  1. only recently, just now