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See also: pastiché

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Via French pastiche, from Italian pasticcio (pie, something blended), from Vulgar Latin *pasticium, from Latin pasta (dough, pastry cake, paste), from Ancient Greek παστά (pastá, barley porridge), from παστός (pastós, sprinkled with salt).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pastiche (plural pastiches)

 
Botticelli's original on the left, pastiche on the right. (1)
  1. A work of art, drama, literature, music, or architecture that imitates the work of a previous artist.
  2. A musical medley, typically quoting other works.
  3. An incongruous mixture; a hodgepodge.
  4. (uncountable) A postmodern playwriting technique that fuses a variety of styles, genres, and story lines to create a new form.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pastiche (third-person singular simple present pastiches, present participle pastiching, simple past and past participle pastiched)

  1. To create or compose in a mixture of styles.
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, in New York Times[1]:
      That the genetic code of the platypus proved to be as bizarrely pastiched as its anatomy enhanced the popular appeal of the report, published in the journal Nature.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

pastiche m (plural pastiches)

  1. pastiche (work that imitates the work of a previous artist)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

pastiche m (plural pastiches)

  1. pastiche (work that imitates the work of a previous artist)