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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
The coat of arms of Kiliaen van Rensselaer (born 1586; buried 1643), a Dutch merchant who founded the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, the largest and most successful patroonship in New Netherland. It occupied what is now mainly the Capital District of New York.

Borrowing from Dutch patroon (patron saint; boss), from Middle Dutch patroon, from Latin patrōnus (protector; patron).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pəˈtɹuːn/
  • Rhymes: -uːn
  • Hyphenation: pa‧troon

NounEdit

patroon (plural patroons)

  1. (US) One of the landowning Dutch grandees of the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, especially after it became a British possession renamed as New York.
    • 1835, Andrew Reed; James Matheson, “Letter XIX”, in A Narrative of the Visit to the American Churches, by the Deputation from the Congregational Union of England and Wales. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, New York, N.Y.: Published by Harper & Brothers, No. 82 Cliff-Street, OCLC 421539636, page 222:
      Dr. Tucker accompanied us on our return; and we made a call on General Van Rensselaer. He is the Patroon, or Lord of the Manor here; and is considered the greatest landholder in the United States.
    • 1844, “a citizen of Pennsylvania” [pseudonym; J. Churchman], A Few Plain Facts, Addressed to the People of Pennsylvania, 3rd enl. edition, Philadelphia, Pa.: J. Crissy, printer, No. 4 Minor Street, OCLC 80750381, page 3:
      In the United States the labourer is a freeman, lives on good substance, and being an honest man, neither fears nor envies the richest patroon about him.
    • 2008, Louisa Wood Ruby, “Dutch Art and the Hudson Valley Patroon Painters”, in Joyce D[iane] Goodfriend, Benjamin Schmidt, and Annette Stott, editors, Going Dutch: The Dutch Presence in America, 1609–2009 (The Atlantic World), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-16368-3, ISSN 1570-0542, page 27:
      One of the earliest “schools” of American painting, the Hudson Valley patroon painters, has often been considered to have derived from seventeenth-century English portraiture. Portraits of English aristocrats appeared to Dutch patroons as displays of the kind of social status they aspired to in their new country. [] Frequently overlooked in the discussion of the appeal of British portraiture to Dutch patroons is the fact that English portraiture of the seventeenth century was, in fact, a direct descendant of the Netherlandish portrait tradition.
    • 2008, Reed Sparling, “A Novel Way of Colonizing: The Patroon System”, in Hudson Valley Voyage: Through the Seasons, through the Years, Fishkill, N.Y.: Involvement Media, ISBN 978-1-929373-16-1, page 21:
      Unlike other American colonies, New Netherland was founded as a commercial venture, but the Dutch West India Company soon realized that it needed people to exploit its investment. [] Jeweler Killiaen Van Rensselaer, a company founder, came up with a solution: the patroon system. Established in 1629, it granted near-feudal rights to any wealthy merchant – or patroon – who agreed to populate the valley. In exchange for taking on the costs of establishing mini-colonies of 48 or more settlers, the patroons were allowed to negotiate with the Indians for the purchase of huge tracts of land, which by law would remain in their families forever.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

patroon (plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie)

  1. pattern or example from which a copy is made
  2. (textiles) template or pattern
  3. pattern; an artistic design or decorative arrangement
  4. pattern; a regular or repeating arrangment (such as in music or concerning events)
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

patroon (plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie)

  1. (firearms) cartridge
  2. cartridge; a container for ink, powder, gas, etc.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

patroon (plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie, feminine patrones)

  1. a child that behaves either old-fashionedly or like an adult
  2. patron; wealthy person who supports an artist, craftsman, a scholar, etc.
  3. (Roman catholicism) patron; patron saint
  4. (historical, Roman antiquity) patron; a master who had freed his slave but still retained some rights over him
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pa‧troon

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch patroon, from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon m, f (plural patroons or patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. patron saint
  2. patron, Maecenas
  3. boss
SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch patroon, from Old French patron (model), from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon n (plural patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. pattern, model

Etymology 3Edit

From German Patrone, ultimately from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon f (plural patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. cartridge (of a firearm)