patroon

Contents

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

The coat of arms of Kiliaen van Rensselaer (born 1586; buried 1643), a Dutch merchant who founded the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, the largest and most successful patroonship in New Netherland. It occupied what is now mainly the Capital District of New York.

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Dutch patroon ‎(patron saint; boss), ultimately from Latin patrōnus ‎(protector; patron).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pəˈtɹuːn/
  • Rhymes: -uːn
  • Hyphenation: pa‧troon

NounEdit

patroon ‎(plural patroons)

  1. (US) One of the landowning Dutch grandees of the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, especially after it became a British possession renamed as New York.

Derived termsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

patroon ‎(plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie)

  1. pattern or example from which a copy is made
  2. (textiles) template or pattern
  3. pattern; an artistic design or decorative arrangement
  4. pattern; a regular or repeating arrangment (such as in music or concerning events)
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

patroon ‎(plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie)

  1. (firearms) cartridge
  2. cartridge; a container for ink, powder, gas, etc.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

patroon ‎(plural patrone, diminutive patroontjie, feminine patrones)

  1. a child that behaves either old-fashionedly or like an adult
  2. patron; wealthy person who supports an artist, craftsman, a scholar, etc.
  3. (Roman catholicism) patron; patron saint
  4. (historical, Roman antiquity) patron; a master who had freed his slave but still retained some rights over him
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pa‧troon

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch patroon, from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon m, f ‎(plural patroons or patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. patron saint
  2. boss
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch patroon, from Old French patron ‎(model), from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon n ‎(plural patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. pattern, model

Etymology 3Edit

From German Patrone, ultimately from Latin patrōnus.

NounEdit

patroon f ‎(plural patronen, diminutive patroontje n)

  1. cartridge (of a firearm)
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