Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Northern French panche, Old French pance (French panse), from Latin pantex.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

paunch (plural paunches)

  1. The first compartment of the stomach of a ruminant, the rumen.
  2. The belly of a human, especially a large, fat protruding one.
  3. (nautical) A paunch mat.
  4. The thickened rim of a bell, struck by the clapper.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

paunch (third-person singular simple present paunches, present participle paunching, simple past and past participle paunched)

  1. To remove the internal organs of a ruminant, prior to eating.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 2
      (Caliban)
      Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him
      I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou may'st brain him,
      Having first seiz'd his books; or with a log
      Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
      Or cut his wezand with thy knife

TranslationsEdit