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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French pavement, from Old French pavement, based on Latin pavimentum (a hard surface, a pounded surface), from pavire (to beat, to ram, to tread down)

NounEdit

pavement (usually uncountable, plural pavements)

  1. Any paved floor.
    • Milton
      The riches of heaven's pavement, trodden gold.
  2. (chiefly Britain) A paved footpath, especially at the side of a road.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, in The China Governess[1]:
      Nanny Broome was looking up at the outer wall. Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.
  3. (US) Any paved exterior surface, as of a road or sidewalk.
    • 1991, Airpower Journal 1911 (page 45)
      The antirunway munitions are specifically designed to cause maximum destruction to airfield pavements.
  4. The interior flooring, especially when of stone, of large buildings such as a cathedral.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pavement, from the verb paver +‎ -ment, based on Latin pavimentum (a hard surface, a pounded surface).

NounEdit

pavement m (plural pavements)

  1. paving
  2. tiled floor

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

paver +‎ -ment, based on Latin pavimentum (a hard surface, a pounded surface).

NounEdit

pavement m (oblique plural pavemenz or pavementz, nominative singular pavemenz or pavementz, nominative plural pavement)

  1. a paved room

DescendantsEdit