See also: Paw and PAW

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
A dog's paw.

From Middle English pawe, from Old French poue, poe, from Frankish *pōta (compare Dutch poot, Low German Pote, German Pfote), from Frankish *pōtōn (to put, stick, plant) (compare Dutch poten 'to plant'), from Proto-Germanic *putōną (compare Old English potian (to push), pȳtan (to put out, poke out), Icelandic pota (to stick), Albanian putër 'paw'). More at put.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paw (plural paws)

  1. The soft foot of a mammal or other animal, generally a quadruped, that has claws or nails; comparable to a human hand or foot.
    Synonyms: hand, foot
    Hypernym: extremity
    Holonym: limb
    Meronyms: claw, finger
  2. (humorous) A hand.
    Get your grubby paws off my things!
Coordinate terms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

paw (third-person singular simple present paws, present participle pawing, simple past and past participle pawed)

  1. (of an animal) To go through something (such as a garbage can) with paws.
  2. (of an animal) To gently push on something with a paw.
  3. (of an animal) To draw the forefoot along the ground; to beat or scrape with the forefoot.
  4. (by extension) To touch someone in a sexual way.
    Synonym: grope
    • 1997 August 17, Robert Spector, misc.fitness.weights (Usenet):
      IronMan used to be good in this way, back in the '80s. [] They wouldn't subscribe to the old, "Let's put a male bodybuilder with silicone babes pawing him" cover that's mainstay now.
    • 1997 October 26, Amy McWilliams, quoting Verbotene, rec.arts.tv.soaps.abc (Usenet):
      So, Katherine was out with Luke and they were both quite dolled up and swoon-worthy. Katherine fawned all over Luke and pawed him, but to what end? Was Stefan supposed to believe that Luke and Katherine have some sort of a thing going? What was the point of this display from Katherine's perspective?
    • 2002 July 18, Lurker Dave, rec.arts.comics.marvel.universe (Usenet):
      Subtlety is great, but what exactly happened with Jessica and the cop during sex that he locked her up afterwards? Also, what was the item she nicked from his shirt while she pawed him?
    • 2018 February, Robert Draper, “They are Watching You—and Everything Else on the Planet: Technology and Our Increasing Demand for Security have Put Us All under Surveillance. Is Privacy Becoming just a Memory?”, in National Geographic[1], Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 14 June 2018:
      Tonight there are no drug deals, no fights, only the random foolishness of the young and inebriated. They stagger with linked arms down the middle of the street. They paw at each other.
    • 2023 October 6, Ryan Gilbey, quoting Illeana Douglas, “The double life of Rock Hudson: ‘Let’s be frank, he was a horndog!’”, in The Guardian[2], →ISSN:
      He was good-looking, masculine, funny, charismatic and he could dance the cha-cha-cha. And he’s never a brute. He’s flirting with women but he’s not pawing them.
  5. (by extension) To clumsily dig through something.
  6. (transitive, dated) To flatter.
Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

The word probably has an origin in baby talk: see ‘pa.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /pɔː/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Homophones: poor (in non-rhotic accents), pore (in non-rhotic accents), pour (in non-rhotic accents)
  • Hyphenation: paw (one syllable)

Noun edit

paw (plural paws)

  1. (nonstandard or rustic) Father; pa.
    Synonyms: pawpaw, pa, papa, father, dad, daddy, pappy
    Hypernym: parent
    Hyponym: step-paw
    Coordinate terms: maw, brother, sis, sissy
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Jingpho edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Burmese ဖော့ (hpau.).

Noun edit

paw

  1. cork

References edit

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016 December 31) “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research[3], volume 35, →DOI, →ISSN, pages 91–128

Lower Sorbian edit

 
paw

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin pavō. Cognates within Slavic include Upper Sorbian paw, Polish paw, Czech páv, Slovene pav, and Russian павли́н (pavlín).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paw (feminine pawa)

  1. peacock (pheasant of one of the genera Pavo and Afropavo)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “paw”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “paw”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Kashubian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Polish paw.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpaf/
  • Syllabification: paw

Noun edit

paw m animal (diminutive pawiã or pawiątkò)

  1. peacock (pheasant of one of the genera Pavo and Afropavo)
    Synonym: fau

Further reading edit

  • Jan Trepczyk (1994) “paw”, in Słownik polsko-kaszubski (in Kashubian), volumes 1–2
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “paw”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[4]
  • paw”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
paw

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old High German phāwe, from Latin pāvō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paw m animal (female equivalent pawica)

  1. (male) peacock
  2. (colloquial) puke; vomit

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
nouns
verbs
verbs

Further reading edit

  • paw in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • paw in Polish dictionaries at PWN