EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /piːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from a North Germanic source, compare dialectal Norwegian penn (peen), Danish pind (peg), German Pinne (the peen of a hammer), Old Swedish pæna (to pound iron with a hammer).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

 
a ball-peen hammer

peen (plural peens)

  1. The (often spherical) end of the head of a hammer opposite the main hammering end.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

peen (third-person singular simple present peens, present participle peening, simple past and past participle peened)

  1. To shape metal by striking it, especially with a peen.
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of penis.

NounEdit

peen (plural peens)

  1. (slang) Penis.
    • 2009, Danny Evans, Rage Against the Meshugenah: Why it Takes Balls to Go Nuts, New American Library (2009), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      With all due respect (and that may be very little), the real truth is that being a dad is sometimes an imposition of pain far worse than any up-the-peen catheter could ever deliver.
    • 2010, Andrea Lavinthal & Jessica Rozler, Your So-Called Life: A Guide to Boys, Body Issues, and Other Big-Girl Drama You Thought You Would Have Figured Out By Now, Harper (2010), →ISBN, page 32:
      Where to touch a man that will drive him wild every time (Hint: It's probably his peen.)
    • 2012, Fanny Merkin & Andrew Shaffer, Fifty Shames of Earl Grey: A Parody, Da Capo Press (2012), →ISBN, page 49:
      It's so quiet you could hear a peen go soft.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:peen.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

NounEdit

peen

  1. genitive plural of pe

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally the plural of Dutch pee, perhaps from Middle Dutch *pede, with plural peden (with a single attestation), of uncertain origin. Compare schoen and teen, also originally plurals but later singulars. Proposed cognates include English pith and French pied.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

peen f (plural penen, diminutive peentje n)

  1. (botany) carrot (Daucus carota)[1]
    Synonym: wortel

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Henk Glas, "Onkruiden herkennen", 2010, Baarn, Tirion Uitgevers, →ISBN, pp. 125-126.

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *peeni. Cognate with Finnish pieni.

AdjectiveEdit

peen (genitive peene, partitive peent)

  1. fine (of small pieces, small size)
  2. thin
  3. fine (of good quality)
  4. fancy

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

peen

  1. genitive singular of pee

IngrianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

peen (genitive peenen, partitive peentä)

  1. Soikkola spelling of peeni
    • 1936, N. A. Iljin and V. I. Junus, Bukvari iƶoroin șkouluja vart, Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 40:
      Peen tulo saatii siint pellost.
      A small income was received from this field.

ReferencesEdit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 404
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachinkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[1], →ISBN, page 74

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

peen

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of peer.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of peer.