penetrate

See also: penetrãte

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin penētrātus, past participle of penētrō (to put, set, or place within, enter, pierce, penetrate), from penes (within, with) by analogy to intrō (to go in, enter).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛnɪtɹeɪt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pen‧e‧trate

VerbEdit

penetrate (third-person singular simple present penetrates, present participle penetrating, simple past and past participle penetrated)

  1. To enter into; to make way into the interior of; to pierce.
    Light penetrates darkness.
    • 1879, Th Du Moncel, The Telephone, the Microphone and the Phonograph, Harper, page 166:
      He takes the prepared charcoal used by artists, brings it to a white heat, and suddenly plunges it in a bath of mercury, of which the globules instantly penetrate the pores of charcoal, and may be said to metallize it.
  2. (figuratively) To achieve understanding of, despite some obstacle; to comprehend; to understand.
    I could not penetrate Burke's opaque rhetoric.
    • 1691, John Ray, The wisdom of God manifested in the works of the creation
      things which here were [] too subtile for us to penetrate
  3. To affect profoundly through the senses or feelings; to move deeply.
    to penetrate one's heart with pity
    • 1867, Matthew Arnold, On the Study of Celtic Literature
      The translator of Homer should penetrate himself with a sense of the plainness and directness of Homer's style.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act 2, scene 3]:
      I am advised to give her music o' mornings; they say it will penetrate
  4. To infiltrate an enemy to gather intelligence.
  5. To insert the penis into an opening, such as a vagina or anus.
    a male elephant comes up and penetrates the female
  6. (chess) To move a piece past the defending pieces of one's opponent.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

penetrate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of penetri

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

penetrate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of penetrare
  2. second-person plural imperative of penetrare
  3. feminine plural of penetrato

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

penetrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of penetrō