pent-up

See also: pent up

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

pent +‎ up

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pent-up (comparative more pent-up, superlative most pent-up)

  1. not expressed (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. repressed or suppressed, especially of emotions or impulses
    He punched his pillow and screamed at the top of his lungs about all the pent-up frustrations from the day.
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Steven Gerrard goal against Poland ensures England will go to World Cup (in The Guardian, 15 October 2013)[1]
      t was that kind of night, full of anxiety and drama and plenty of danger, until, finally, Steven Gerrard made sure all the pent-up emotion could be released.
    • 2020 July 15, Tony Streeter, “Charters return to running... but in an uncertain environment”, in Rail, page 35:
      Anecdotally, demand has held up - rather than cancelling, people are asking when they might be able to travel. There is a sense of some pent-up demand.

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