English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek περίφρασις (períphrasis).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

periphrasis (countable and uncountable, plural periphrases)

  1. The use of a longer expression instead of a shorter one with a similar meaning, for example "I am going to" instead of "I will".
  2. (linguistics) Expressing a grammatical meaning (such as a tense) using a syntactic construction rather than morphological marking.
    Language learners sometimes use periphrases like "did go" where a native speaker would use "went".
    Native speakers use periphrases like "did not go" where a language learner might use "went not".
  3. (rhetoric) The substitution of a descriptive word or phrase for a proper name (a type of circumlocution).
    • 1835, L[arret] Langley, A Manual of the Figures of Rhetoric, [], Doncaster: Printed by C. White, Baxter-Gate, →OCLC, page 37:
      Periphrasis a single thought expands,
      And uses many words for what but few demands.
    • 1879, F. D. Morice, Pindar, chapter 4, page 63:
      The "glen," or the "brake of the lion," is Pindar's favourite periphrasis for Nemea.
  4. (rhetoric) The use of a proper name as a shorthand to stand for qualities associated with it.

Synonyms

edit
edit

Translations

edit

References

edit