permission

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French permission, from Latin permissio. Mostly replaced native English leave, from Old English lēaf (permission).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

permission (countable and uncountable, plural permissions)

  1. authorisation; consent (especially formal consent from someone in authority)
    Sire, do I have your permission to execute this traitor?
  2. The act of permitting.
  3. (computing) Flags or access control lists pertaining to a file that dictate who can access it, and how.
    I used the "chmod" command to change the file's permission.

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VerbEdit

permission (third-person singular simple present permissions, present participle permissioning, simple past and past participle permissioned)

  1. (transitive) To grant or obtain authorization for.
    • 2003, Mary Ellen Lepionka, Writing and Developing Your College Textbook[1], page 190:
      Photographs also must be permissioned and credited, although a corpus of copyright-free images does exist online.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin permissiō, permissiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

permission f (plural permissions)

  1. permission

Related termsEdit

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