personally

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English personally, personely, personallich, personaliche, equivalent to personal +‎ -ly.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɜːsnəli/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

personally (comparative more personally, superlative most personally)

  1. In a personal manner.
  2. In person.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 19, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.
    • 1956 [1880], Johanna Spyri, Heidi, translation of original by Eileen Hall, page 84:
      'There's a boy here who wants to speak to Miss Clara personally,' he announced.
  3. Concerning oneself.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      Personally I felt shy and uncomfortable at this obsequious adoration, and I read the same feeling in the faces of Roxton and Summerlee, but Challenger expanded like a flower in the sun.
    I'm really annoyed with her, personally.
  4. As a person.
    I like you personally, but as a colleague you are useless.

TranslationsEdit