See also: PIC, pić, píč, piç, and pìc

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of picture

NounEdit

pic (plural pics or pix)

  1. (informal) A picture, especially a photographic image.
  2. (informal) A movie.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pic (plural pics)

  1. A Turkish cloth measure, varying from 18 to 28 inches.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian pizzo.[1]

NounEdit

pic m (indefinite plural pica, definite singular pici, definite plural picat)

  1. (nonstandard) tip, top, end

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “picërr”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 325

CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

From picar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pic m (plural pics)

  1. pickaxe
  2. peak (of a mountain)
  3. peak (moment of maximum intensity)
  4. knock, strike, blow
  5. prick, sting
  6. (typography) dot, bullet
  7. (Mallorca) time (occasion)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pik/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *piccus, from Latin pīcus.

NounEdit

pic m (plural pics)

  1. woodpecker
  2. pick (tool)
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Spanish pico.

NounEdit

pic m (plural pics)

  1. peak, summit
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle Irish pic, picc, from Latin pix.

NounEdit

pic f (genitive singular pice)

  1. pitch, tar

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pic phic bpic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


KashubianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *piti.

VerbEdit

pic

  1. to drink

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

pic

  1. Alternative form of piken

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *pik.

NounEdit

piċ n

  1. pitch

Alternative formsEdit

  • pic

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *piccus (sharp point).

NounEdit

pic m (oblique plural pis, nominative singular pis, nominative plural pic)

  1. a sharp point or spike.

DescendantsEdit


PolabianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *peťь.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pic f

  1. furnace, oven

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Deverbal of picować.

NounEdit

pic m inan

  1. (colloquial) fib, hoax, lie
    Synonyms: blaga, oszustwo
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
adverb
nouns
verb

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

pic f

  1. genitive plural of pica

Further readingEdit

  • pic in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pic in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain, maybe from the root *peh₂w- (few, small).

Most likely from Vulgar Latin picca, from earlier *piccus, borrowed from Proto-Celtic *bikkos (small, little). Eventually influenced by dissimilation by paucus (few, little). Cognate with Sicilian picca, Italian piccolo, Sicilian pìcciulu, Spanish pequeño, Sicilian picciriḍḍu. Compare also French petit, English pinch.

NounEdit

pic n (plural picuri)

  1. a drop (of water)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

pic

  1. little (not much)
    Eu știu spaniolă doar un pic.I know Spanish just a little.

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • When used as an adverb (in the sense of "little"/"small amount"), pic is always preceded by un, similar to Italian/Spanish un poco, or French un peu.

See alsoEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English pike.

NounEdit

pic f (plural picean)

  1. pike, spear
  2. pickaxe

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SloveneEdit

NounEdit

píc

  1. genitive plural of pica