pile on



pile on ‎(third-person singular simple present piles on, present participle piling on, simple past and past participle piled on)

  1. (transitive, idiomatic) to jump on top of someone or something quickly.
    • 2006, Steven M. Hallock, Editorial and Opinion: The Dwindling Marketplace of Ideas in Today's News, Praeger, ISBN 978-0275993306, page 69:
      As football linebackers pile on a quarterback in a blitz, the newspaper editorialist heaped sarcasm onto the president.
    • 2009, Human Kinetics with Thomas Hanlon, The Sports Rules Book - 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, ISBN 978-0736076326, page 116:
      Piling on: Players may not pile on a runner after the ball is dead or intentionally fall upon any prostrate player.
    • 2011, Michael Harston, The Show: The Michael Thomas Story, Xlibris, ISBN 978-1456862220, page 21:
      The quarterback turns and hands the ball to his fullback just as Sumo hits him in the backfield causing a fumble. Ball loose, ball loose screamed Jones. There is a mad scramble for the loose ball as bodies pile on top of each other.


pile on ‎(plural pile ons)

  1. An argument or fight in which one side is greatly advantaged by being more numerous or more closely allied than the other side.
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