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See also: Prat, prát, prât, and přát

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹat/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English prat, from Old English præt, prætt (trick, prank, craft, art, wile), from Proto-Germanic *prattuz (boastful talk, deceit), from Proto-Indo-European *brodno- (to wander about). Cognate with Saterland Frisian prat, Dutch pret (fun, pleasure, gaity), obsolete Dutch prat (cunning, strategem, scheme, a prideful display, arrogance), Low German prot, Norwegian prette (trick), Icelandic prettur (a trick). Related to pretty.

NounEdit

prat (plural prats)

  1. (now Scotland) A cunning or mischievous trick; a prank, a joke. [from 10th c.]
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prat (comparative more prat, superlative most prat)

  1. (obsolete) Cunning, astute. [13th-17th c.]

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown. Perhaps a specialised note of Etymology 1 (see above).

NounEdit

prat (plural prats)

  1. (slang) A buttock, or the buttocks; a person's bottom. [from 16th c.]
    • Thomas Dekker, 1608, The Canters Dictionarie in The Belman of London (second part Lanthorne and Candlelight)
      Pratt, a Buttock.
    • 1707, Shirley, John, “The Maunder's Praise of his Strowling Mort”, in The Triumph of Wit:
      No gentry mort hath prats like thine, / No cove e'er wap'd with such a one.
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 5:
      Mungo didn't like their attitude. Nor did he like exposing his prat in mixed company.
  2. (Britain, slang) A fool. [from 20th c.]
  3. (slang) The female genitals.
    • 1967 (sourced to 1942), William A. Schwartz, The Limerick: 1700 Examples with Notes, Variants and Examples Vol 1, Greenleaf Classics 1967, p. 124:
      "She's a far better piece
      Than the Viceroy's niece,
      Who has also more fur on her prat."
    • 1984 John Murray, ed, Panurge, Vol 1–3, p. 39:
      "...they would kidnap a girl and take her back to their camp where they would pull down her knickers, hoping to find hairs on her prat."
    • 2005 Sherrie Seibert Goff, The Arms of Quirinus, iUniverse 2005, p. 135:
      "My prat was sore from the unfamiliar activities of the night before, but my virgin bleeding had ceased, and we rode most of the day in that unworldly haze that comes with lack of sleep."
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pratt, in Sex-Lexis.com by Farlex.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prātum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prat m (plural prats)

  1. meadow

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Germanic, cognate with praten (to talk), pret (fun) and English prat (trick, prank).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prat (comparative pratter, superlative pratst)

  1. (used with op) focused, bent, fixated
  2. (obsolete) proud, haughty, arrogant

InflectionEdit

Inflection of prat
uninflected prat
inflected pratte
comparative pratter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial prat pratter het pratst
het pratste
indefinite m./f. sing. pratte prattere pratste
n. sing. prat pratter pratste
plural pratte prattere pratste
definite pratte prattere pratste
partitive prats pratters

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

prat f (plural pratten, diminutive pratje n)

  1. A pride, arrogance
  2. the act of pouting or sulking

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

prat

  1. supine of praś

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German or Low German

NounEdit

prat m (definite singular praten, indefinite plural prater, definite plural pratene)
prat n (definite singular pratet, indefinite plural prat, definite plural prata or pratene)

  1. chat, talk
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

prat

  1. imperative of prate

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German or Low German

NounEdit

prat m (definite singular praten, indefinite plural pratar, definite plural pratane)
prat n (definite singular pratet, indefinite plural prat, definite plural prata)

  1. chat, talk

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin prātum.

NounEdit

prat m (plural prats)

  1. meadow

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Germanic, compare above

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prat n

  1. Speech, talk

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit