EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin prognōsis, from Ancient Greek πρόγνωσις (prógnōsis, foreknowledge, perceiving beforehand, prediction), from prefix προ- (pro-, before) + γνῶσις (gnôsis, inquiry, investigation, knowing), from γιγνώσκω (gignṓskō, know). First attested in the mid 17th century. Equivalent to Germanic cognate foreknowledge, Latinate cognate precognition, and Sanskritic cognate prajna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prognosis (plural prognoses)

  1. (medicine) A forecast of the future course of a disease or disorder, based on medical knowledge.
  2. (medicine) The chances of recovery from a disease.
    • 1861, John Neill, Francis Gurney Smith, An Analytical Compendium of the Various Branches of Medical Science, Blanchard and Lea, page 858,
      The prognosis is unfavourable when the child is very young, when the eruption appears before the third day, or when it suddenly disappears.
    • 1987, Constance S. Kirkpatrick, Nurses' Guide to Cancer Care, Rowman and Littlefield, →ISBN, page 132,
      Once the patient has worked through the stage of grieving at diagnosis, adjustment may be successful as therapy is begun and a prognosis is determined.
  3. A forecast of the future course, or outcome, of a situation; a prediction.
    • 1963 September, “The potential of a railway”, in Modern Railways, page 145:
      Despite the positive, constructive aspects of the Beeching Report, the gloomy prognoses on B.R. which issued from so many commentators prior to its publication have left a widespread impression that the railway is an outdated concept.
    • 2008, Paul Fairfield, Why Democracy?, SUNY Press, →ISBN, page 123,
      If free speech is the lifeblood of democracy then the fate and the prognosis of the latter are that of the former.
    • 2000, Guy R. Woolley, J. J. J. M. Goumans, P. J. Wainwright, Waste Materials in Construction, Elsevier, →ISBN, page 19,
      The prognosis was made by taking into consideration the facts that the analog concrete had already achieved its ultimate strength by the period of 1500 days while concrete being predicted was to gain its strength limit by 1.25 time faster, that is by the period of 100 days.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  • 2005, Ed. Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson, The Oxford Dictionary of English (2nd edition revised), Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • 1998, The Dorling Kindersley Illustrated Oxford Dictionary, Dorling Kindersley Limited and Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 654
  • 2007, Ed. Elizabeth A. Martin, Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • prognosis” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πρόγνωσις (prógnōsis, foreknowledge, perceiving beforehand, prediction), from prefix προ- (pro-, before) + γνῶσις (gnôsis, inquiry, investigation, knowing), from γιγνώσκω (gignṓskō, know).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prognōsis f (genitive prognōsis); third declension

  1. forecast, prediction

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prognōsis prognōsēs
Genitive prognōsis prognōsium
Dative prognōsī prognōsibus
Accusative prognōsem prognōsēs
prognōsīs
Ablative prognōse prognōsibus
Vocative prognōsis prognōsēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit