proportion

See also: Proportion

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English proporcion, from Old French proportion, from Latin prōportiō (comparative relation, proportion, symmetry, analogy), from pro (for, before) + portio (share, part); see portion.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proportion (countable and uncountable, plural proportions)

  1. (countable) A quantity of something that is part of the whole amount or number.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter VI, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, the worn-out, passionless men, the enervated matrons of the summer capital, []!”
  2. (uncountable) Harmonious relation of parts to each other or to the whole.
  3. (countable) Proper or equal share.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      Let the women [] do the same things in their proportions and capacities.
  4. The relation of one part to another or to the whole with respect to magnitude, quantity, or degree.
    the proportion of the parts of a building, or of the body
  5. (mathematics, countable) A statement of equality between two ratios.
  6. (mathematics, archaic) The "rule of three", in which three terms are given to find a fourth.
  7. (countable, chiefly in the plural) Size.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; [] . Now she had come to look upon the matter in its true proportions, and her anticipation of a possible chance of teaching him a lesson was a pleasure to behold.
    • 2012 May 20, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Marge Gets A Job” (season 4, episode 7; originally aired 11/05/1992)”, in The Onion AV Club:
      What other television show would feature a gorgeously designed sequence where a horrifically mutated Pierre and Marie Curie, their bodies swollen to Godzilla-like proportions from prolonged exposure to the radiation that would eventually kill them, destroy an Asian city with their bare hands like vengeance-crazed monster-Gods?

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

proportion (third-person singular simple present proportions, present participle proportioning, simple past and past participle proportioned)

  1. (transitive) To divide into proper shares; to apportion.
    • 1960 April, “The braking of trains”, in Trains Illustrated, page 237:
      In order to proportion the braking force to the weight carried by a wheel - a matter of special importance in the braking of wagons - variable leverage systems are now being introduced in which the end of one axle spring is linked to a control spring in the change-over valve, so automatically varying the leverage exerted by the brake-rod according to whether the wagon is full or empty.
  2. (transitive) To form symmetrically.
  3. (transitive, art) To set or render in proportion.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To correspond to.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōportiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proportion f (plural proportions)

  1. proportion