prospectus

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From French prospectus (a prospectus), borrowed from Latin.

NounEdit

prospectus (plural prospectuses or prospectus)

  1. A document, distributed to prospective members, investors, buyers, or participants, which describes an institution (such as a university), a publication, or a business and what it has to offer.
  2. A document which describes a proposed endeavor (venture, undertaking), such as a literary work (which one proposes to write).
  3. A booklet or other document giving details of a share offer for the benefit of investors.
    • 1960 March, J. P. Wilson & E. N. C. Haywood, “The route through the Peak - Derby to Manchester: Part One”, in Trains Illustrated, page 148:
      The Manchester, Buxton, Matlock & Midlands Junction Railway, which was the title of this project, issued its prospectus on May 30, 1845, and announced that "this Company is formed to complete the communication by Railway between Lancashire and the East Districts. [...]". The capital to be raised was £800,000.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin prospectus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pʁɔs.pɛk.ty/ (Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?)

NounEdit

prospectus m (plural prospectus)

  1. prospectus, leaflet
    • 1923, Marcel Proust, À la recherche du temps perdu, Volume 6 (La Prisonnière), Chapter 1
      ...Bergotte ne fit plus venir de médecin et essaya avec succès, mais avec excès, de différents narcotiques, lisant avec confiance le prospectus accompagnant chacun d'eux, prospectus qui proclamait la nécessité du sommeil mais insinuait que tous les produits qui l'amènent (sauf celui contenu dans le flacon qu'il enveloppait et qui ne produisait jamais d'intoxication) étaient toxiques et par là rendaient le remède pire que le mal.
      ...Bergotte no longer sent for a doctor, and tried successfully, but excessively, different narcotics, reading with confidence the prospectus which accompanied each one; a prospectus which proclaimed the need for sleep, but hinted that all the preparations which induce it (except the one contained in the bottle, which never produced intoxication) were toxic, and thus made the remedy worse than the disease.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perfect passive participle of prōspiciō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prospectus m (genitive prospectūs); fourth declension

  1. view, sight, prospect
    • Caes. G. 2, 22:
      in prospectu esse
    • 78, Plinius, Naturalis Historia, XIX, 59
      iam in fenestris suis plebs urbana imagine hortorum cotidiana oculis rura praebebant, antequam praefigi prospectus omnes coegit multitudinis innumerae saeva latrocinatio.
  2. panorama
    • 2015, Francisci, Laudato si' §85:
      Ex amplissimis prospectibus ad minimam vitae formam, natura mirationem reverentiamque indesinenter concitat
      From panoramic vistas to the tiniest living form, nature is a constant source of wonder and awe.

DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prospectus prospectūs
Genitive prospectūs prospectuum
Dative prospectuī prospectibus
Accusative prospectum prospectūs
Ablative prospectū prospectibus
Vocative prospectus prospectūs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ParticipleEdit

prōspectus (feminine prōspecta, neuter prōspectum); first/second-declension participle

  1. watched or looked (out)
  2. discerned
  3. foreseen

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative prōspectus prōspecta prōspectum prōspectī prōspectae prōspecta
Genitive prōspectī prōspectae prōspectī prōspectōrum prōspectārum prōspectōrum
Dative prōspectō prōspectō prōspectīs
Accusative prōspectum prōspectam prōspectum prōspectōs prōspectās prōspecta
Ablative prōspectō prōspectā prōspectō prōspectīs
Vocative prōspecte prōspecta prōspectum prōspectī prōspectae prōspecta

ReferencesEdit