See also: Psalm

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English salm or psalme, from Old English psealm, later reinforced from Old French psalme (modern French psaume), both from Latin psalmus, from Ancient Greek ψαλμός (psalmós, the sound emanating from twitching or twanging perhaps with the hands or fingers, mostly of musical strings) (from ψάλλω (psállō, to make a sound by striking, touching, plucking, rubbing, twanging, or vibrating)), but later in New Testament times the meaning of ψαλμός (psalmós) evolved from its Classical meaning of "a tune played to the harp" to a more general tune that could be played with any instrument; even a song sung with or without musical accompaniment. By the Byzantine Period, it lost all of its instrumental nuances.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

psalm (plural psalms)

  1. (religion, music) A sacred song; a poetical composition for use in the praise or worship of God.
  2. One of the hymns by David and others, collected into one book of the Old Testament, or a modern metrical version of such a hymn for public worship.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

psalm (third-person singular simple present psalms, present participle psalming, simple past and past participle psalmed)

  1. To extol in psalms; to make music; to sing
    to psalm his praises.
    • 2012, George D. Manjounes, Good Morning, Morning Glory
      I psalmed like a Moslem high in his mosque. And like a Greek priest, I sang the divine liturgy of St. John Chrysostom.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

psalm m (plural psalmen, diminutive psalmpje n)

  1. (music) psalm

DescendantsEdit

  • Negerhollands: psalm, posallem

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

psalm m inan

  1. (music) psalm

DeclensionEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Church Slavonic ѱалъмъ (psalŭmŭ), from Ancient Greek ψαλμός (psalmós)

NounEdit

psalm m (plural psalmi)

  1. psalm

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse salmr, psalmr, from Latin psalmus, from Ancient Greek ψαλμός (psalmós, the sound emenating from twitching or twanging perhaps with the hands or fingers, mostly of musical strings).

NounEdit

psalm c

  1. a hymn, a church song
  2. a psalm of David, one of the chapters of the book of Psalms

Usage notesEdit

  • Denominations in Sweden outside of the Church of Sweden (e.g. baptists) have traditionally not used the word psalm, but rather visa, sång (song). Recent integrated hymnbooks are titled Psalmer och visor (1976) and Psalmer och Sånger (1987) to indicated that they cover both the Church of Sweden and other denominations.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of psalm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative psalm psalmen psalmer psalmerna
Genitive psalms psalmens psalmers psalmernas

AnagramsEdit