Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pulpit, from Latin pulpitum (platform).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʊl.pɪt/, /ˈpʌl.pɪt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

pulpit (plural pulpits)

  1. A raised platform in a church, usually enclosed, where the minister or preacher stands when giving the sermon.
  2. Activity performed from a church pulpit, in other words, preaching, sermons, religious teaching, the preaching profession, preachers collectively or an individual preaching position; by extension: bully pulpit.
  3. A raised desk, lectern, or platform for an orator or public speaker.
  4. (nautical) The railing at the bow of a boat, which sometimes extends past the deck. It is sometimes referred to as bow pulpit. The railing at the stern of the boat is sometimes referred to as a stern pulpit; other texts use the term pushpit.
  5. A bow platform for harpooning.
  6. (Britain military slang, dated) A plane's cockpit.
    • 1941 March 24, Life, p. 85:
      In the slang of the Royal Air Force man, the cockpit of his plane is the ‘pulpit’ or ‘office’, the glass covering over it the ‘greenhouse’.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pulpitum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pulpit

  1. A pulpit (podium for religious oratory)
  2. A podium for non-religious oratory.
  3. (rare) A seat in a church for royalty.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: pulpit
  • Scots: poopit, poupit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pulpitum (platform).

NounEdit

pulpit m inan

  1. desktop (the main graphical user interface of an operating system)

DeclensionEdit