put together

See also: put-together

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

put together (third-person singular simple present puts together, present participle putting together, simple past and past participle put together)

  1. (transitive) To assemble, construct, build, or formulate.
    If you try to put together the model kit yourself, be careful not to break any of the pieces.
    We'll need to put together a plan if we want to get this project finished.
    • 2011 October 1, Saj Chowdhury, “Wolverhampton 1 - 2 Newcastle”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Alan Pardew's current squad has been put together with a relatively low budget but the resolve and unity within the team is priceless.
  2. (transitive) To gather one's thoughts and come to conclusions.
    • 2021, Michael Farris Smith, chapter 40, in Nick, New York; Boston; London: Little, Brown and Company, page 206:
      They were drunk and slow and she was quick to her boot and quick with the blade and she had sliced one across the arm and the other across the cheek before either could put together what was happening.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

put together

  1. In total.
    Alaska has more land than Texas and Oklahoma put together.
  2. (especially with an adjective indicating degree) Stable and sound psychologically and hence in other respects; competent and responsible.
    • 2011, Sondra Busby, Understanding Life and Its Challenges, →ISBN:
      Today, Bessy is still unmarried but she is well put together. She has bought two new cars since the divorce, she now owns her home, two of her children have college degrees, one is certified in medical assisting, []
    • 1954, Annette Marie Garrett, Learning Through Supervision, page 78:
      I had the impression that she is well put together and has good ego-strength. She is aware of her tendency to be overly self-critical, is working on it and making some progress.

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