See also: Puter, putër, and 'puter

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

puter (plural puters)

  1. Alternative form of 'puter

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *puH-; compare Sanskrit पूयति (pū́yati, stinks, rots), Ancient Greek πῦον (pûon, discharge from a sore), πύθω (púthō, to rot), Gothic 𐍆𐌿𐌻𐍃 (fuls, foul), Old English fūl (foul) (whence English foul), from the same root.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

puter (feminine putris, neuter putre); third-declension three-termination adjective

  1. rotten, decaying
  2. crumbling, friable

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension three-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative puter putris putre putrēs putria
Genitive putris putrium
Dative putrī putribus
Accusative putrem putre putrēs putria
Ablative putrī putribus
Vocative puter putris putre putrēs putria

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: podre
  • Italian: putre
  • Kabuverdianu: podri
  • Papiamentu: putrí
  • Portuguese: podre
  • Spanish: podre
  • Welsh: pwdr

ReferencesEdit

  • puter in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • puter in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

puter m or f

  1. indefinite plural of pute

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

puter f

  1. indefinite plural of pute

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Butter (pronounced with initial unaspirated [p] in an Austro-Bavarian accent), from Middle High German buter, from Old High German butira, from Proto-West Germanic *buterā, from Latin būtȳrum, from Ancient Greek βούτῡρον (boútūron).

NounEdit

pȕter m (Cyrillic spelling пу̏тер)

  1. butter

DeclensionEdit