See also: quasi-

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi (as if).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkweɪ.zaɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkwɑ.zi/, /ˈkwɑ.zaɪ/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

quasi (not comparable)

  1. resembling or having a likeness to something
    • 2000, Henry Martyn Robert; Sarah Corbin Robert, Robert's Rules of Order, 10th revised edition, page 522:
      The presiding officer of the assembly does not appoint a chairman of the quasi committee, but remains in the chair himself throughout its proceedings.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. almost, nearly, quasi
    Synonym: gairebé

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi (as if).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. quasi

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. almost, nearly
    Synonym: presque

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. as it were, so to speak, effectively, essentially
    Synonyms: gewissermaßen, gleichsam, sozusagen

Further readingEdit

  • quasi” in Duden online

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. almost, nearly
    Synonyms: circa, poco meno che, pressoché, per poco non

AdjectiveEdit

quasi (invariable)

  1. almost
    ti presento il mio quasi marito
    meet my almost-husband

ConjunctionEdit

quasi

  1. (with subj.) as if
    Synonym: quasiché
    dà continuamente ordini quasi fosse lui il padrone
    he continually gives orders as if he were the boss

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Univerbation of quam (how, as) +‎ (if) with clitic shortening of the first vowel and iambic shortening of the second.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkʷa.si/, [ˈkʷäs̠ɪ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈkwa.si/, [ˈkwäːs̬i]
  • Note: still found with the long final syllable in Lucretius, and again in late Latin poets.

ConjunctionEdit

quasi

  1. (almost) as if, like
    Synonyms: ceu, (perinde) ac sī, tanquam, velut, sīcut
    quasi vērō nesciam!as if I don't know!

DescendantsEdit

  • Old Venetian: asques (Trevignano), squasio
  • Old Lombard: quaxe
  • Old Occitan: quaisses, cais
  • Old Catalan: quaix
  • Old Portuguese: acais
  • Asturian: cuasi
  • Dutch: quasi
  • English: quasi
  • Esperanto: kvazaŭ
  • French: quasi
  • Galician: case

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • quasi in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • quasi in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • quasi in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • quasi in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to obscure the mental vision: mentis quasi luminibus officere (vid. sect. XIII. 6) or animo caliginem offundere
    • to represent a thing dramatically: sic exponere aliquid, quasi agatur res (non quasi narretur)
    • to make a cursory mention of a thing; to mention by the way (not obiter or in transcursu): quasi praeteriens, in transitu attingere aliquid
    • belief in God is part of every one's nature: omnibus innatum est et in animo quasi insculptum esse deum
    • I said en passant, by the way: dixi quasi praeteriens or in transitu

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin quasi.

AdverbEdit

quasi

  1. almost, nearly

PortugueseEdit

AdverbEdit

quasi (not comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of quase