See also: Ration

English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

edit

From French ration. Doublet of reason and ratio.

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈɹæʃən/, enPR: răshʹən
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

Noun

edit

ration (plural rations)

  1. A portion of some limited resource allocated to a person or group.
    • 1943 November – 1944 February (date written; published 1945 August 17), George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], Animal Farm [], London: Secker & Warburg, published May 1962, →OCLC:
      The corn ration was drastically reduced, and it was announced that an extra potato ration would be issued to make up for it.

Derived terms

edit

Translations

edit

Verb

edit

ration (third-person singular simple present rations, present participle rationing, simple past and past participle rationed)

  1. (transitive) To supply with a ration; to limit (someone) to a specific allowance of something.
    We rationed ourselves to three sips of water a day until we were rescued.
  2. (transitive) To portion out (especially during a shortage of supply); to limit access to.
    By the third day on the raft, we had to ration our water.
  3. (transitive) To restrict (an activity etc.)
    Our present health care system is rationed only to those who can afford it because of unnecessary high cost, lack of insurance coverage by 47 million people, and exorbitant prescription prices.

Synonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit

Translations

edit

Anagrams

edit

French

edit

Etymology

edit

Learned borrowing from Latin ratiō. Doublet of raison, which was inherited.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

ration f (plural rations)

  1. ration

Derived terms

edit

Further reading

edit

Anagrams

edit

Interlingua

edit

Noun

edit

ration (plural rationes)

  1. ratio, proportion