See also: réalise and réalisé

English

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Verb

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realise (third-person singular simple present realises, present participle realising, simple past and past participle realised)

  1. Non-Oxford British English standard spelling of realize.
    • 1915, Louis Joseph Vance, “Burglary”, in Nobody, New York, N.Y.: George H[enry] Doran Company, →OCLC, page 35:
      SHE wakened in sharp panic, bewildered by the grotesquerie of some half-remembered dream in contrast with the harshness of inclement fact, drowsily realising that since she had fallen asleep it had come on to rain smartly out of a shrouded sky.
      The 1st edition, published in Munsey’s Magazine, (November 1914) uses realizing instead.
    • 1952 March, R. K. Kirkland, “The Railways of Uxbridge”, in Railway Magazine, page 147:
      [] Uxbridge thought it could safely ignore the railway [] . Like many other towns which adopted similar tactics, Uxbridge soon realised its mistake.
    • 2013 June 7, Ed Pilkington, “‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 6:
      In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 68:
      As the 1857 to Manchester Piccadilly rolls in, I scan the windows and realise there are plenty of spare seats, so I hop aboard. The train is a '221'+'220' combo to allow for social distancing - a luxury on an XC train as normally you're playing sardines, so I make the most of it.

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