See also: Reaper

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English reper, repare, repere, *riper (the last, attested only in surnames Ryper, Riper, etc.), from Old English rīpere (reaper), equivalent to reap +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

reaper (plural reapers)

  1. One who reaps; a person employed to harvest crops from the fields by reaping.
    • 1913, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Poison Belt[1]:
      Even as we looked some rumour seemed to have spread, for we saw the reapers hurrying from the fields.
  2. A machine used to harvest crops.
  3. (often with initial capital) Short for Grim Reaper.
    • 1976, Buck Dharma (Blue Öyster Cult), "Don't Fear the Reaper" (song)
      Don't fear the Reaper / We'll be able to fly
    • 1999, Karl S. Guthke, The Gender of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature (page 7)
      Why is the Grim Reaper a man? True, the noun ending would theoretically allow us to visualize the reaper as a woman as well, but we don't.

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