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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From remedy +‎ -less.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛmədilɪs/
  • Hyphenation: rem‧e‧di‧less

AdjectiveEdit

remediless (not comparable)

  1. Not having a remedy; not capable of being remedied. [from 16th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.11:
      I driven am to great distresse, / And forced to forgoe th'attempt remedilesse.
    • 1603, John Florio, transl.; Michel de Montaigne, chapter 12, in The Essayes, [], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      As for the rest, this disease is not so easily discovered, except it be altogether extreame and remedilesse; forasmuch as reason marcheth ever crooked, halting and broken-hipt; and with falshood as with truth; and therefore it is very hard to discover her mistaking and disorder.
    • 2010, Pakistan Labour Cases, volume 51, page 55:
      [] cannot be taken to mean that the petitioners have been left remediless.

Derived termsEdit