Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin repellens.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

repellent (comparative more repellent, superlative most repellent)

  1. Tending or able to repel; driving back.
  2. Repulsive, inspiring aversion.
    • 2014 April 12, Michael Inwood, “Martin Heidegger: the philosopher who fell for Hitler [print version: Hitler's philosopher]”, in The Daily Telegraph (Review)[1], London, page R11:
      [Martin] Heidegger's repellent political beliefs do not contaminate his philosophical work.
  3. Resistant or impervious to something.

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

repellent (plural repellents)

  1. Someone who repels.
  2. A substance used to repel insects, other pests, or dangerous animals.
  3. A substance or treatment for a fabric etc to make it impervious to something.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit