Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin replicatus, past participle of replicare ‎(to fold or bend back; reply), from re ‎(back) + plicare ‎(to fold); see ply.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈrɛpləˌkeɪt/ (verb)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈrɛpləˌkət/ (noun)

VerbEdit

replicate ‎(third-person singular simple present replicates, present participle replicating, simple past and past participle replicated)

  1. To make a copy (replica) of.
    On entering a host cell, a virus will start to replicate.
  2. (sciences) To repeat (an experiment or trial) with a consistent result.
    • 2014 June 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892:
      [Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes and trying to replicate them in his laboratory. He believed that the Bible contained numerological codes.
  3. (obsolete) To reply.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

replicate ‎(plural replicates)

  1. an outcome of a replication procedure; an exact copy or replica

AdjectiveEdit

replicate ‎(comparative more replicate, superlative most replicate)

  1. (botany, zoology) Folded over or backward; folded back upon itself.
    a replicate leaf or petal
    the replicate margin of a shell

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