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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

reyse (third-person singular simple present reyses, present participle reysing, simple past and past participle reysed)

  1. Obsolete form of raise.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English reysen (to travel, journey, go on a military expedition), probably from Middle Dutch reisen, resen (compare Old English rāsian (to explore)), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *raisōną (to set out, depart, journey). Cognate with Danish rejse (to travel), Dutch reizen (to travel), German reisen (to travel), Norwegian reise (to travel), Swedish resa (to travel). See also reys.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

reyse (third-person singular simple present reyses, present participle reysing, simple past and past participle reysed)

  1. (obsolete) To go on a military expedition.
    Thou that hast reysed in the Holy Land may thine name be breme and mere for aye.
  2. (obsolete) To journey or travel.
    That mighty wye that reysed frae the ords to the ends of the known world.
Usage notesEdit

In the second sense, fell out of common usage in the 16th century. Was displaced by journey and travel.

ReferencesEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for reyse in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

reyse

  1. Alternative form of reysen (to raise)