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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English rift, of North Germanic origin; akin to Danish rift, Norwegian Bokmål rift (breach), Old Norse rífa (to tear). More at rive.

NounEdit

rift (plural rifts)

  1. A chasm or fissure.
    My marriage is in trouble: the fight created a rift between us and we can't reconnect.
    The Grand Canyon is a rift in the Earth's surface, but is smaller than some of the undersea ones.
  2. A break in the clouds, fog, mist etc., which allows light through.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Vintage 1993, page 130:
      I have but one rift in the darkness, that is that I have injured no one save myself by my folly, and that the extent of that folly you will never learn.
  3. A shallow place in a stream; a ford.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rift (third-person singular simple present rifts, present participle rifting, simple past and past participle rifted)

  1. (intransitive) To form a rift; to split open.
  2. (transitive) To cleave; to rive; to split.
    to rift an oak
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, (please specify the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals)]:
      to the dread rattling thunder / Have I given fire and rifted Jove's stout oak / With his own bolt
    • 1822, William Wordsworth, "A Jewish Family (in a small valley opposite St. Goar, upon the Rhine)" 9-11, [1]
      The Mother—her thou must have seen, / In spirit, ere she came / To dwell these rifted rocks between.
    • 1894, Ivan Dexter, Talmud: A Strange Narrative of Central Australia, published in serial form in Port Adelaide News and Lefevre's Peninsula Advertiser (SA), Chapter III, [2]
      he stopped rigid as one petrified and gazed through the rifted logs of the raft into the water.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse rypta.

VerbEdit

rift (third-person singular simple present rifts, present participle rifting, simple past and past participle rifted)

  1. (obsolete outside Scotland and northern Britain) To belch.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

rift (obsolete)

  1. past participle of rive
    The mightie trunck halfe rent, with ragged rift
    Doth roll adowne the rocks, and fall with fearefull drift.

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb rive

NounEdit

rift f or m (definite singular rifta or riften, indefinite plural rifter, definite plural riftene)

  1. a rip, tear (in fabric)
  2. a break (in the clouds)
  3. a scratch (on skin, paint)
  4. a rift (geology)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From the verb rive or riva

NounEdit

rift f (definite singular rifta, indefinite plural rifter, definite plural riftene)

  1. a rip, tear (in fabric)
  2. a break (in the clouds)
  3. a scratch (on skin, paint)
  4. a rift (geology)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *riftą, *riftiją, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rebʰ- (to cover; arch over; vault). Cognate with Old High German peinrefta (legwear; leggings), Old Norse ript, ripti (a kind of cloth; linen jerkin).

NounEdit

rift n (nominative plural rift)

  1. A veil; curtain; cloak

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: rift

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse rypta.

VerbEdit

rift (third-person singular present rifts, present participle riftin, past riftit, past participle riftit)

  1. to belch, burp