EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Danish/Norwegian rift 'breach', Old Norse rífa 'to tear'. More at rive.

NounEdit

rift (plural rifts)

  1. A chasm or fissure.
    My marriage is in trouble, the fight created a rift between us and we can't reconnect.
    The Grand Canyon is a rift in the Earth's surface, but is smaller than some of the undersea ones.
  2. A break in the clouds, fog, mist etc., which allows light through.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Vintage 1993, p. 130:
      I have but one rift in the darkness, that is that I have injured no one save myself by my folly, and that the extent of that folly you will never learn.
  3. A shallow place in a stream; a ford.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rift (third-person singular simple present rifts, present participle rifting, simple past and past participle rifted)

  1. (intransitive) To form a rift.
  2. (transitive) To cleave; to rive; to split.
    to rift an oak
    • Wordsworth
      To dwell these rifted rocks between.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse rypta.

VerbEdit

rift (third-person singular simple present rifts, present participle rifting, simple past and past participle rifted)

  1. (obsolete except Scotland and northern UK) To belch.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

rift

  1. (obsolete) past participle of rive
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse rypta.

VerbEdit

tae rift (third-person singular simple present rifts, present participle riftin, simple past riftit, past participle riftit)

  1. to belch, burp
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 18:13