See also: RIPE, ripé, and řípě

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ɹaɪp/, /ɹaːɪp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪp

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ripe, rype, from Old English rīpe (ripe, mature), from Proto-West Germanic *rīpī, from Proto-Germanic *rīpijaz, *rīpiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rep- (to snatch). Cognate with West Frisian ryp (ripe), Dutch rijp (ripe), German reif (ripe). Related to reap.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ripe (comparative riper, superlative ripest)

  1. (of fruits, vegetables, seeds etc.) Ready for reaping or gathering; having attained perfection; mature
    ripe grain
    ripe apples
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      So mayst thou live, till, like ripe fruit, thou drop / Into thy mother's lap.
    • 2013 May-June, David Van Tassel, Lee DeHaan, “Wild Plants to the Rescue”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3:
      Plant breeding is always a numbers game. [] The wild species we use are rich in genetic variation, […]. In addition, we are looking for rare alleles, so the more plants we try, the better. These rarities may be new mutations, or they can be existing ones that are neutral—or are even selected against—in a wild population. A good example is mutations that disrupt seed dispersal, leaving the seeds on the heads long after they are ripe.
  2. (of foods) Advanced to the state of fitness for use; mellow
    ripe cheese
    ripe wine
  3. (figuratively) Having attained its full development; mature; perfected
    Synonym: consummate
    • 1895, Henry James, The Altar of the Dead
      She was a feature of that piety, but even at the ripe stage of acquaintance in which they occasionally arranged to meet at a concert or to go together to an exhibition she was not a feature of anything else.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Life of King Henry the Eighth:
      He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one.
  4. (archaic) Maturated or suppurated; ready to discharge; -- said of sores, tumors, etc.
  5. Ready for action or effect; prepared.
    • 1988, Queensrÿche, Revolution Calling
      But the time is ripe for changes. There's a growing feeling. That taking a chance on a new kind of vision is due
    • 1705 (revised 1718), Joseph Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy
      while things were just ripe for a war
    • (Can we date this quote by Burke and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I am not ripe to pass sentence on the gravest public bodies.
    • 1910, Theodore C. Williams, The Aeneid, translation of 'Aeneis' by Virgil, Book IV Chapter 28:
      nor was the doom / of guilty deed, but of a hapless wight / to sudden madness stung, ere ripe to die, / therefore the Queen of Hades had not shorn / the fair tress from her forehead, nor assigned / that soul to Stygian dark.
  6. Like ripened fruit in ruddiness and plumpness.
  7. (obsolete) Intoxicated.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act V, Scene 1,
      Alonso: And Trinculo is reeling-ripe: where should they / Find this grand liquor that hath gilded them? / How cam'st thou in this pickle?
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:drunk
  8. (law) Of a conflict between parties, having developed to a stage where the conflict may be reviewed by a court of law.
    • 2004, Kenneth F. Warren, Administrative Law in the Political System[2], →ISBN, page 427:
      Problems emerge in judging whether a case is ripe, however, when contested general agency directives are issued that are not aimed at specific parties.
  9. Smelly: having a disagreeable odor.
    • 2004, Colum McCann, Fishing the Sloe-Black River[3], →ISBN, page 141:
      Dolores, giving her a bath yesterday, said she was a bit ripe under the armpits.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:malodorous
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

ripe (plural ripes)

  1. (agriculture) A fruit or vegetable which has ripened.
    • 1993, Paul J. Dosal, Doing Business with the Dictators[4], →ISBN, page 76:
      When he realized that the ripes would not make it back to Selma, Zemurray offered a free bunch of bananas to any telegraph operator who notified local grocers that he was coming through with a shipment of bananas.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ripe (third-person singular simple present ripes, present participle riping, simple past and past participle riped)

  1. To ripen or mature
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ripe, from Latin ripa.

NounEdit

ripe (plural ripes)

  1. The bank of a river.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

ripe (third-person singular simple present ripes, present participle riping, simple past and past participle riped)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To search; to rummage.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

ripe

  1. (chiefly in the plural) the leftovers, remains

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ripe (Kotus type 48/hame, pp-p gradation)
nominative ripe rippeet
genitive rippeen rippeiden
rippeitten
partitive ripettä rippeitä
illative rippeeseen rippeisiin
rippeihin
singular plural
nominative ripe rippeet
accusative nom. ripe rippeet
gen. rippeen
genitive rippeen rippeiden
rippeitten
partitive ripettä rippeitä
inessive rippeessä rippeissä
elative rippeestä rippeistä
illative rippeeseen rippeisiin
rippeihin
adessive rippeellä rippeillä
ablative rippeeltä rippeiltä
allative rippeelle rippeille
essive rippeenä rippeinä
translative rippeeksi rippeiksi
instructive rippein
abessive rippeettä rippeittä
comitative rippeineen
Possessive forms of ripe (type hame)
possessor singular plural
1st person rippeeni rippeemme
2nd person rippeesi rippeenne
3rd person rippeensä

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ripe

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of riper
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of riper
  3. second-person singular imperative of riper

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

ripe f

  1. plural of ripa

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin (noun, sense 1); from the same origin as rive (noun sense 2 and verb)

NounEdit

ripe f or m (definite singular ripa or ripen, indefinite plural riper, definite plural ripene)

  1. (nautical) gunwale, edge
    Synonyms: båtripe, esing
  2. a scratch

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ripe (imperative rip, present tense riper, passive ripes, simple past ripa or ripet or ripte, past participle ripa or ripet or ript, present participle ripende)

  1. to scratch, score
  2. to strike (a match)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin (noun, sense 1); from the same origin as rive (noun sense 2 and verb)

NounEdit

ripe f (definite singular ripa, indefinite plural riper, definite plural ripene)

  1. (nautical) gunwale, edge
    Synonyms: båtripe, esing
  2. a scratch

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ripe (present tense ripar, past tense ripa, past participle ripa, passive infinitive ripast, present participle ripande, imperative rip)

  1. to scratch, score
  2. to strike (a match)

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *rīpī, from Proto-Germanic *rīpiz.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ˈriː.pe/

AdjectiveEdit

rīpe

  1. ripe
  2. mature

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ripe

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

ripe

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of ripar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of ripar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of ripar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of ripar