See also: Rivet

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French rivet (13th century), from the verb Old French river (to fetter [a person]) (12th century), from Old French rive (rim, edge) (ca. 1100), which is ultimately from Latin ripa (riverbank). Compare river, rival, riparian.

The sense "kind of footman's armour" is apparently a back-formation from almain rivet, which is apparently derived from the English noun; see that entry for more.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪvət/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪvət

NounEdit

rivet (plural rivets)

 
Two solid rivets.
  1. A cylindrical mechanical fastener that attaches multiple parts together by fitting through a hole and deforming the head(s) at either end.
  2. (figuratively) Any fixed point or certain basis.
  3. (obsolete) A light kind of footman's plate armour; an almain rivet.
    • 1550, Edward Hall, “(please specify the part of the work)”, in The Vnion of the Two Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre & Yorke, Beyng Long in Continuall Discension for the Croune of this Noble Realme, [], London: [] Rychard Grafton, [] [and Steven Mierdman], OCLC 1112934976:
      over his rivet he had a garment of white cloth of gold with a redde crosse
    • 1903, The Archaeological Journal, page 105:
      In 1579 it is mentioned that Almain rivets are now out of use, and in lieu of them a corselett shall be found. The rivets varied in cost; in 1509 they were to be had for 8s., in 1512 they were imported at 16s., and again in 1513  []

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rivet (third-person singular simple present rivets, present participle riveting or rivetting, simple past and past participle riveted or rivetted)

  1. (transitive) To attach or fasten parts by using rivets. [from early 15th c.]
  2. (transitive) To install rivets.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To command the attention of. [from c. 1600]
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To make firm or immovable.
    Terror riveted him to the spot.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Andalusian Arabic رِبَاط(ribát), from Arabic رِبَاط(ribāṭ, something which binds).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rivet m (plural rivets)

  1. weather strip, draught excluder
  2. edging, piping
  3. (in the plural) hints, traces
    • 1898, Marià Vayreda, Recorts de la darrera carlinada:
      Ara, ab més reflexió, trobo que fou senzillament un acte de cobardía ab ribets de personal egoisme.
      Now, after more reflection, I find that it was simply and act of cowardice with traces of personal egoism.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ripa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rivet m (plural rivets)

  1. rivet (mechanical fastener)

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

rīvet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of rīvō