EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹuːst/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːst

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English roste (chicken's roost; perch), from Old English hrōst (wooden framework of a roof; roost), from Proto-Germanic *hrōstaz (wooden framework; grill); see *raustijaną.

Cognate with Dutch roest (roost), German Low German Rust (roost), German Rost (grate; gridiron; grill).

NounEdit

roost (plural roosts)

  1. The place where a bird sleeps (usually its nest or a branch).
  2. A group of birds roosting together.
  3. A bedroom
  4. (Scotland) The inner roof of a cottage.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

roost (third-person singular simple present roosts, present participle roosting, simple past and past participle roosted)

  1. (intransitive, of birds or bats) To settle on a perch in order to sleep or rest
  2. (figurative) to spend the night
    • 2019 November 21, Samanth Subramanian, “How our home delivery habit reshaped the world”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The UPS package centre for central London, a brief walk from Kentish Town tube station, holds a below-ground bay in which 170 vans roost every night.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse róst

NounEdit

roost (plural roosts)

  1. (Shetland and Orkney) A tidal race.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

roost (third-person singular simple present roosts, present participle roosting, simple past and past participle roosted)

  1. Alternative form of roust

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish rúsc, from Proto-Celtic *ruskos (compare Welsh rhisgl).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

roost m (genitive singular roost, plural roostyn)

  1. peel, rind
  2. bark

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

roost (verbal noun roostey, past participle rooisht)

  1. to strip, peel, hull, rind, unbark
  2. to rob
  3. to bare
  4. to debunk
  5. to rifle
  6. to deprive

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

roost

  1. Alternative form of roste (roast)