See also: ROSC, rosć, rość, and róść

English

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Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Irish rosc (rhetorical composition), form Old Irish rosc (short poem, ode).

Noun

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rosc (countable and uncountable, plural roscada)

  1. An ancient form of unrhymed Old Irish verse that uses alliteration and meter.
    • 1995, Calvert Watkins, How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics, →ISBN, page 255:
      Liam Breatnach observed in an important article (Breatnach 1984, with references) that 'Old Irish texts appear in three forms: prose, rhyming syllabic verse, and rosc. The simplest definition of rosc is that it is neither of the other two.'
    • 1997, Maria Tymoczko, The Irish Ulysses, →ISBN, page 307:
      Elsewhere we find descriptions of the most archaic Irish poetry, the passages of obscure poetry called rosc. Sigerson analyzes rosc as rhythmical though unrhymed verse designed to express or to stir up vehement enthusiasm and claims it is the first example of blank verse (Bards of the Gael and Gall 25); Hull characterizes rosc as a declamatory, alliterative blank verse where changes of meter correspond to changes of idea (Text Book I: 202-4).
    • 2005, Theodore William Moody, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Francis X. Martin, A New History of Ireland - Volume 1, →ISBN, page 446:
      Likewise, the 'Cauldron of poesy' and 'Bretha Déin Chécht' both contain prose, rosc, and rhyming syllabic verse.
    • 2016, Maria Tymoczko, Translation in a Postcolonial Context, →ISBN:
      Until the last few decades, however, many of the roscada were interpreted as prose, but recent scholarship has suggested that most, if not all, are poems composed according to archaic metrical principles that had been largely superseded by the eighth century.

Anagrams

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Irish

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Etymology 1

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From Old Irish rosc (eye).

Noun

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rosc m (genitive singular roisc, nominative plural roisc)

  1. eye
Declension
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Old Irish rosc (short poem, ode).

Noun

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rosc m (genitive singular roisc, nominative plural roisc)

  1. rhetorical composition, rhapsodical chant
Declension
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Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • English: rosc (learned)

Further reading

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Old Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Unknown.[1]

Noun

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rosc n or m (genitive roisc or ruisc)

  1. eye
    Synonym: súil
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 56a18
      ind roisc du·n-écomnacht-su dún, a Dǽ
      of the eye that you sg have given us, O God
Declension
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Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative roscN roscN roscL, rosca
Vocative roscN roscN roscL, rosca
Accusative roscN roscN roscL, rosca
Genitive roiscL, ruisc rosc roscN
Dative ruscL roscaib roscaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants
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Further reading

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Etymology 2

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Related to Old Irish seichid (to declare).[2]

Noun

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rosc ?

  1. a short poem, ode or chant
  2. a legal maxim or award
Derived terms
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Descendants
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Further reading

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References

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  1. ^ Vendryes, Joseph (1974) “1 rosc”, in Lexique Étymologique de l'Irlandais Ancien [Etymological lexicon of Old Irish] (in French), volume R-S, Dublin, Paris: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, page R-44
  2. ^ Vendryes, Joseph (1974) “2 rosc”, in Lexique Étymologique de l'Irlandais Ancien [Etymological lexicon of Old Irish] (in French), volume R-S, Dublin, Paris: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, page R-44