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See also: Rut, Rút, and rüt

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French rut (noise, roar, bellowing), from Latin rugītus, from rugīre (to roar).

NounEdit

rut (plural ruts)

  1. (zoology) Sexual desire or oestrus of cattle, and various other mammals. [from early 15th c.]
  2. The noise made by deer during sexual excitement.
  3. Roaring, as of waves breaking upon the shore; rote.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (intransitive) To be in the annual rut or mating season.
  2. (intransitive) To have sexual intercourse.
  3. (transitive, rare) To have sexual intercourse with.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
a rut on a main road (sense 1)

Probably from Middle English route, from Middle French route (road). See also rutter.

NounEdit

rut (plural ruts)

  1. (automotive) A furrow, groove, or track worn in the ground, as from the passage of many wheels along a road. [from 16th c.]
    Synonyms: groove, furrow
  2. (figuratively) A fixed routine, procedure, line of conduct, thought or feeling. [from 19th c.]
    Synonyms: routine
  3. (figuratively) A dull routine.
    Dull job, no interests, no dates. He's really in a rut.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (transitive) To make a furrow.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • rot (southern Moselle Franconian)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German rōt.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rut (masculine rude, feminine rut, comparative ruder, superlative rutste)

  1. (Ripuarian, northern Moselle Franconian) red

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French rut, from Latin rugītus. Compare also rugir.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rut m (plural ruts)

  1. rut (sexual excitement)

Further readingEdit


VilamovianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), akin to German rot, Old Saxon rōd, Old Dutch rōd (modern Dutch rood); from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ-.

AdjectiveEdit

rūt

  1. red