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AfittiEdit

NounEdit

sál

  1. (Ditti) palm-leaf broom

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Alex de Voogt, A sketch of Affiti phonology, in Studies in African Linguistics 38:1 (2009)

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from German Saal.[1][2]

NounEdit

sál m

  1. room
  2. saloon
  3. hall
  4. theater (operating theater for surgery)
    Zraněného přivezli na operační sál.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sál

  1. third-person masculine past of sát

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Machek, Václav (1968) Etymologický slovník jazyka českého (in Czech), 2nd edition edition, Prague: Academia, page 536
  2. ^ Rejzek, Jiří (2007) Český etymologický slovník (in Czech), Version 1.0 edition, Prague: Leda

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Schal, from English shawl, from Persian شال(šâl, shawl, scarf).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃaːl]
  • Hyphenation: sál

NounEdit

sál (plural sálak)

  1. scarf
  2. shawl

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative sál sálak
accusative sálat sálakat
dative sálnak sálaknak
instrumental sállal sálakkal
causal-final sálért sálakért
translative sállá sálakká
terminative sálig sálakig
essive-formal sálként sálakként
essive-modal
inessive sálban sálakban
superessive sálon sálakon
adessive sálnál sálaknál
illative sálba sálakba
sublative sálra sálakra
allative sálhoz sálakhoz
elative sálból sálakból
delative sálról sálakról
ablative sáltól sálaktól
Possessive forms of sál
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. sálam sáljaim
2nd person sing. sálad sáljaid
3rd person sing. sálja sáljai
1st person plural sálunk sáljaink
2nd person plural sálatok sáljaitok
3rd person plural sáljuk sáljaik

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sál, from Old English sāwol, sāwl, from Proto-Germanic *saiwalō.

NounEdit

sál f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálir)

  1. a soul
    • Einar Benediktsson
      Aðgát skal höfð í nærveru sálar.
      Exercise caution in the presence of a soul.
    Blóð er gjaldmiðill sálarinnar.
    Blood is the currency of the soul.
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Attested since the 16th century; origin uncertain. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *sahalō, from the root *seh- (to cut), originally denoting a bag sewn from cut-out pieces of skin; or perhaps from *sawalō, related to sjóður (purse), or from *saihalō, related to sár (cask).

NounEdit

sál f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálar)

  1. a skin bag
DeclensionEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sál f pl

  1. genitive plural of sáil

NounEdit

sál f (genitive singular sáile, nominative plural sála)

  1. Alternative form of sáil (heel)
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sál shál
after an, tsál
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls. Akin to Latin sal and English salt.

NounEdit

sál m

  1. salt water, brine, seawater
  2. (poetic, by extension) sea, ocean
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 1132
      sáil-onn .i. cloch sáil
      sea-rock i.e. rock of the sea
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Celtic *stātlā (compare Welsh sawdl), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand).

NounEdit

sál f

  1. heel
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 68b7
      sál
      glosses calx

InflectionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative sálL sáilL sálaH
Vocative sálL sáilL sálaH
Accusative sáilN sáilL sálaH
Genitive sáileH sálL sálN
Dative sáilL sálaib sálaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived termsEdit
  • sál tre assa (tonsure, literally heel through the shoe)
DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
sál ṡál unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit