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See also: säd and sæð

Contents

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛːd/, [sɛːˀð]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sáð (seed), from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz.

NounEdit

sæd c (singular definite sæden, not used in plural form)

  1. seed, semen, sperm
  2. seed (fertilized grain)
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse siðr.

NounEdit

sæd c (singular definite sæden, plural indefinite sæder)

  1. custom
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sáð, from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz.

NounEdit

sæd m (definite singular sæden, uncountable)

  1. semen, sperm
  2. (agriculture) seed (anything that can be sown that yields a crop)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sáð, from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz.

NounEdit

sæd m (definite singular sæden, uncountable)

  1. semen, sperm

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂-. Cognate with Old Frisian sed (West Frisian sêd), Old Saxon sad, Dutch zat, Old High German sat (German satt), Old Norse saðr, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌸𐍃 (saþs).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sæd

  1. full, sated
    • Ic eom anhaga iserne wund bille gebennad beadoweorca sæd ecgum werig
      I am a lonely thing, wounded with iron, switten by sword, sated with battle-work, weary of blades.[1]
  2. weary
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *sēdiz (seed; that which can be sown). Cognate with Old Frisian sēd (West Frisian sied), Old Saxon sād (Low German Saad), Dutch zaad, Old High German sāt (German Saat), Old Norse sáð (Danish sæd, Swedish säd), Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌸𐍃 (sēþs).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sǣd n (nominative plural sæd)

  1. (West Saxon) seed
DescendantsEdit