EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old French

NounEdit

salade (plural salades)

  1. A kind of helmet; a sallet.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

salade (plural salades)

  1. Obsolete form of salad.
    • (Can we date this quote by Charles Lamb and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      This morning, May 2, 1662, having first broken my fast upon eggs and cooling salades, mellows, watercresses []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for salade in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /saːˈlaːdə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sa‧la‧de
  • Rhymes: -aːdə

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French salade, from Italian salata.

NounEdit

salade f (plural salades, diminutive saladetje n)

  1. salad (a food made primarily of a mixture of raw ingredients, typically vegetables)
  2. (archaic) lettuce
    • 1654 July 8, Jan van Riebeeck, Daghregister, part 1, page 238.
      Bij welcke missive vernemende hare veelvoudige siecken ende grooten noodt om verversinge, lieten datelijck een mande met salade ende 2 goede sacken vol cool gereet maecken, daer se
      den 9en do., fraij labber uijtte N.Westen coelende, 'smorgens vroegh weder mede na boort sonden, nevens 't navolgende briefken, luijdende van woorde te woorde als volcht:
      Learning by means of this missive of their manifold sickpeople and great need for refreshment, [we] immediately let a basket of lettuce and 2 good bags full of cabbage be prepared, so that [we] / sent them along, on the 9th of the same month, [the wind] blowing rather softly from the North West, on board again in the early morning, beside the following letter, reading word by word as follows:
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch salade, from Middle French salade, from Old French salade.

NounEdit

salade f (plural salades)

  1. A sallet, a salade (certain type of round helmet).
Alternative formsEdit

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Northern Italian salada, salata (compare insalata), from Vulgar Latin *salāta, from *salō, from Latin saliō, from sal (salt).

NounEdit

salade f (plural salades)

  1. salad (raw vegetables in general)
  2. salad (a serving of raw vegetables)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian celata, from Latin caelata.

NounEdit

salade f (plural salades)

  1. (historical) sallet
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

salade

  1. salad

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French salade, from Italian salada, which some forms are directly from.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsalad(ə)/, /ˈsalat(ə)/, /ˈsaləd(ə)/

AdjectiveEdit

salade (plural saladys)

  1. (Late Middle English, rare) salad (dish made of mixed vegetables)
  2. (Late Middle English, rare) An ingredient in a salad.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: salad
  • Scots: sallet

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

salade f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) burnet