See also: salivá and salivă

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

A learned borrowing from Latin salīva (spittle), replacing or merging with Middle English salive, salve (saliva), from the same Latin source. Further origin uncertain. Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *salw-, *sal- (dirt, dirty), cognate with Old English salu (dark, dusky). More at sallow.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: sə-līʹ-və, IPA(key): /səˈlaɪvə/
  • Hyphenation: sa‧li‧va
  • Rhymes: -aɪvə

NounEdit

saliva (countable and uncountable, plural salivas or salivae or salivæ)

  1. (physiology) A clear, slightly alkaline liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands, consisting of water, mucin, protein, and enzymes. It moistens the mouth, lubricates ingested food, and begins the breakdown of starches.
    Synonyms: spit, spittle

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin salīva, attested from the 14th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saliva f (plural salives)

  1. saliva

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “saliva” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

saliva

  1. third-person singular past historic of saliver

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /saˈli.va/
  • Hyphenation: sa‧lì‧va

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin salīva.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

saliva f (plural salive)

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  1. (physiology) saliva, spittle, spit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

saliva

  1. inflection of salivare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

saliva

  1. third-person singular imperfect indicative of salire

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *solH- (compare Irish salach (dirty), Welsh halog, English sallow, Russian соло́вый (solóvyj, cream-colored)).[1] May alternatively be of independent expressive/onomatopoeic origin; compare Ancient Greek σίαλον (síalon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

salīva f (genitive salīvae); first declension

  1. spittle, saliva

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative salīva salīvae
Genitive salīvae salīvārum
Dative salīvae salīvīs
Accusative salīvam salīvās
Ablative salīvā salīvīs
Vocative salīva salīvae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • saliva in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • saliva in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • saliva in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • saliva in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  1. ^ Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1954), “saliva”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 2, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 468

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From Latin salīva, probably borrowed.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saliva f (plural salivas)

  1. saliva, spittle (liquid secreted into the mouth)

VerbEdit

saliva

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of salivar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of salivar

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French saliver, from Latin salivare.

VerbEdit

a saliva (third-person singular present salivează, past participle salivat1st conj.

  1. to salivate
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

saliva f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of salivă

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /saˈliba/, [saˈli.β̞a]

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin salīva, probably borrowed[1].

NounEdit

saliva f (plural salivas)

  1. saliva, spittle
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

saliva

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of salivar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of salivar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of salivar.

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit