Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Urdu صراف(sarrāf) and Persian صراف(sarâf), from Arabic صَرَّاف(ṣarrāf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saraf (plural sarafs)

  1. A provider of financial services in the Middle East and in South Asia, especially (historical) during the early modern and colonial period.
    • 1598, William Phillip translating Jan Huygen van Linschoten as Discours of Voyages into ye Easte & West Indies, Bk. i, Ch. xxxiii, p. 66:
      There is in euery place of the street exchangers of mony, by them called Xaraffos, which are all christian Iewes.
    • 1811, John Pinkerton translating Carsten Niebuhr as "Travels in Arabia" in A General Collection of Voyages and Travels..., Vol. X, p. 71:
      He sent us to receive the money from his Saraf, or banker.
    • 1877, James Carlile McCoan, Egypt As It Is, p. 115:
      The mâmour... till the recent reform appointing a Controller-General of Receipts, received the taxes from the saraffs.
    • 1897 July, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, p. 24:
      They [Armenians] prospered as our ‘Sarrafs’.

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic صَرَّاف(ṣarrāf).

NounEdit

saraf m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling סאראף‎)

  1. money changer