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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare Old Norse skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

NounEdit

scoff (plural scoffs)

  1. Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
    • Shakespeare
      With scoffs, and scorns, and contumelious taunts.
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard
      'I believe you've killed that constable in the exercise of his duty, Sir; the man's dead,' said Lowe, sternly.
      'Another gloss on my text; why invade me like housebreakers?' said Dangerfield with a grim scoff.
    • 1852, The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
      There were sneers, and scoffs, and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways []
  2. An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
    • Cowper
      The scoff of withered age and beardless youth.
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VerbEdit

scoff (third-person singular simple present scoffs, present participle scoffing, simple past and past participle scoffed)

  1. (intransitive) To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
    • Goldsmith
      Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff, remained to pray.
  2. (transitive) To mock; to treat with scorn.
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Etymology 2Edit

A variant, attested since the mid 19th century, of scaff, of uncertain origin.[1][2] Compare scarf (eat quickly).

NounEdit

scoff (countable and uncountable, plural scoffs)

  1. (South Africa and British Army slang) Food.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

scoff (third-person singular simple present scoffs, present participle scoffing, simple past and past participle scoffed)

  1. (Britain, slang) To eat food quickly.
  2. (South Africa and British Army slang) To eat.
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See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ scoff” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ scoff” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.