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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian secco (dry).

AdjectiveEdit

secco (not comparable)

  1. (art) dry
    Secco painting, or painting in secco, is painting on dry plaster, as distinguished from fresco painting, on wet or fresh plaster.
  2. (music) dry – sparse accompaniment, staccato, without resonance

NounEdit

secco (plural seccos)

  1. (art) A work painted on dry plaster, as distinguished from a fresco.
    • 1987, James Black, Recent Advances in the Conservation and Analysis of Artifacts (page 289)
      The Roman frescoes are generally robust, but the Chinese and Egyptian seccos are inherently weak []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for secco in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

secco (feminine singular secca, masculine plural secchi, feminine plural secche)

  1. dry
  2. dried
  3. thin
  4. sharp

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

secco m (plural secchi)

  1. dryland
  2. dryness
  3. drought

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

secco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of seccare

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit