See also: SEER and şeer

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

see +‎ -er (agent suffix).

NounEdit

seer (plural seers)

  1. One who sees something; an eyewitness.
  2. One who foretells the future; a clairvoyant, prophet, soothsayer or diviner.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See sihr.

NounEdit

seer (plural seers)

  1. Alternative form of sihr

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From se (to see) +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seer c (singular definite seeren, plural indefinite seere)

  1. viewer (someone who watches television)
  2. seer (someone who foretells the future)

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch sēr, from Proto-Germanic *sairaz.

AdjectiveEdit

sêer

  1. painful, sore
  2. sick
InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: zeer

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch sēr, from Proto-Germanic *sairą.

NounEdit

sêer n

  1. pain, ache
  2. sorrow, emotional pain
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English sēar.

NounEdit

seer

  1. Alternative form of sere (dry)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse sér.

AdjectiveEdit

seer

  1. Alternative form of sere (differing)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From se +‎ -er

NounEdit

seer m (definite singular seeren, indefinite plural seere, definite plural seerne)

  1. (TV) a viewer
  2. a seer, prophet

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

seer

  1. to be
    • 13th century, Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, Quen vai contra Santa María con sobervia :
      [...] contra a que vencer foi ao démo per saber ser homildosa [...]
      [...] against her who defeated the devil by being humble [...]

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō. As time passed, it merged with ser (to be), from Latin sum (to be).

VerbEdit

seer

  1. to sit
    • 9th century, Anonymous, Glosas Emilianenses :
      in domo tua manes (tu siedes)
      [in Latin] you sit/remain at home, [in Old Spanish, glossing Latin manēs ‘you remain’] you sit/remain
    • between 1140-1207, Anonymous (or Per Abbat), Cantar de mío Cid 1001:
      Las armas auien presas & sedien sobre los cauallos
      They had taken up arms and were sitting on their horses
    • between 1140-1207, Anonymous (or Per Abbat), Cantar de mío Cid 3118:
      Sed en ũtro escaño com̃o Rey a señor
      (modernized spelling) Sed (=Sé) en vuestro escaño, como rey a señor
      Sit on your chair, as a king [overlooking] a lord
    • 1250, Anonymous, Pre-Alphonsian Bible E6 Mark.13.22:
      e farã ſignos é marauillas pora engannar los eſcogidos ſi ſeer puede
      (modernized spelling) E farán (=harán) signos e maravillas pora (=para) engañar los escogidos si seer puede
      And they shall make signs and wonders to trick the elect if it can be (=if it's possible)