Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English sēar.

NounEdit

seir

  1. Alternative form of sere (dry)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse sér.

AdjectiveEdit

seir

  1. Alternative form of sere (differing)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

seir

  1. imperative of seire

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

seir m (oblique plural seirs, nominative singular seirs, nominative plural seir)

  1. Alternative form of soir
    • circa 1150, Turoldus, La Chanson de Roland:
      Vengez voz fi[l]z, voz freres e voz heirs,
      Qu’en Rencesvals furent morz l’altre seir
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *sɸerā.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seir f

  1. heel

InflectionEdit

Feminine t-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative seir seirithL, seir seirith
Vocative seir seirithL, seir seirthea
Accusative seirithN seirithL, seir seirthea
Genitive seireth seireth seirethN
Dative seirithL seirthib seirthib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Like siur (sister) and sine (nipple), this term lenited with /f/, spelled ph or f, instead of the typical /h/, in this case due to its descent from Proto-Celtic sɸ-.

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
seir pheir, feir unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit